Will the National Eucharistic Revival Be a Success?

June 18, 2024 00:33:29
Will the National Eucharistic Revival Be a Success?
Crisis Point
Will the National Eucharistic Revival Be a Success?

Jun 18 2024 | 00:33:29

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Hosted By

Eric Sammons

Show Notes

The upcoming National Eucharistic Congress is the milestone event of the three-year National Eucharistic Revival. Will the Congress (and the Revival) be successful? How will we know?
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Episode Transcript

[00:00:17] The upcoming National Eucharistic Congress is the milestone event of the three year long national Eucharistic renewal. Will the Congress and the, I sure, sorry, revival, not renewal. Will the congress and the revival be successful, and if so, how will we know if it's successful? That's. We're gonna talk about today on crisis. Plain hole. I'm Eric Simmons, your host, air in chief of Crisis magazine. Before we get started, smash that, like, button. Hit it like you're raising your hands at a revival. [00:00:47] And also subscribe to the channel. Let other people know about it. Subscribe to our email newsletter, just go to crisismagazine.com putting your email address, and we'll send you an email once a day with our articles. [00:00:58] And you can also follow us on social media at crisismag. Before I really get on the topic, I was just want to thank the people I saw in Detroit when I was at the people's convention this past weekend with Donald Trump and a few others, like 10,000 people there. I think we had a great breakout session talking about, I was talking about the state of the church and how it will impact the upcoming election. I actually have a article, I think it's going to be published tomorrow, Wednesday the 19th, about my experiences at the convention and how I kind of view the upcoming election. So be sure to check that out again. That will be tomorrow. Okay. So next month, this is, I'm recording this live on June 18, I think 2024. So next month, in July, we're going to have the National Eucharistic Congress in Indianapolis. Not too far from me, actually. And this is part of a three year national eucharistic revival. And the mission of the revival, as stated on their website, is to renew the church by enkindling a living relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ in the Holy Eucharist. And so I think we should look at how do we view if this, this is a successful revival of successful congress? [00:02:16] How will we know if it kind of did what it's supposed to do? Why are they having it? And, you know, what's the origins of it? I want to talk about that today because this is upcoming. A lot of people are talking about that. We're in the middle of the eucharistic pilgrimages, which I'll mention in a minute. I think this is important because I think this really speaks to a lot of how the institutional church works and how it doesn't work, to be honest. So let's get into it then. So the way the revival, the eucharistic revival is set up. It's a three year program. It started in 2022. And so the first year, from the summer of 2022 to 2023 is the year of diocesan renewal. Honestly, I think this is just like the diocese were supposed to start getting ready, maybe doing some programs talking about the Eucharist more then the next year. The year 220-23-2024 is, was the year of parish renewal. So again, programs at the parish level, people talking about the Eucharist more. I mean, really, it was very nebulous what the, what you're supposed to do. During those two years, I didn't see very much happening in many diocese or parishes about it, but I think it was more a matter of, let's get ready for this, this final year, which we're now in. And it kicked off at Pentecost with the national eucharistic pilgrimages, which I believe there's five different pilgrimages that are all converging on Indianapolis. There's actually going to be one coming through Cincinnati, where I am. I plan to go to it. And so basically it's eucharistic processions, adoration, things like that at different cities where the Eucharist basically goes from one location to Indianapolis. I think one goes from Baltimore to Indianapolis. No one from, I think St. Paul one, I think all the, from California. And so on these routes, they stop at churches, they do processions in the streets. I know in Cincinnati, they're going to have something at the cathedral downtown, and then they're going to do a procession and some type of event, I think, in the main square of downtown Cincinnati. I think that's what's happening a lot of places. And that's all leading up to the Congress, which is in Indianapolis from July 17 through the 21st. [00:04:30] And this is when they want to have thousands of people, tens of thousands of people, Catholics attend this conference, which will have lots of presentations. It will have revival sessions, I mean, like evening sessions where they have these speakers, music, breakout sessions during the day, some liturgy. So lots of stuff going on at multiple locations in downtown Indianapolis. I just want to say first, I do commend the organizers for having it in Indianapolis and not in like, Washington, DC or Los Angeles or New York. A lot of times these things are done at these major cities, which are very expensive to host it. They're not geographically very central. So having a city like Indianapolis, which is relatively central, yet also large enough to kind of handle this number of people, I think was, was a good move. Probably the only, the only city I can think of it might be better, might be like St. Louis because it's more Catholic and it's more centrally located. But Indianapolis, good choice there. And then after the Congress is over, the final year of the eucharistic revival is to. Is missionary sending is what they call it. Basically, after the Congress, supposed to be excited, go out, tell people about Jesus in the Eucharist. That's. That's the essential structure of this. [00:05:49] Now, why are. This is the USCCB is who the conference of Bishops is, who has organized this and who has decided on this? Why is this that they're having this? Well, the stated reason is in response to that infamous Pew research poll back in survey back in 2019. I think that shows 70%. I think it was technically 69%, but we'll round. 70% of Catholics did not believe in the real presence of Jesus in the Eucharist. 70%. I mean, this was a shocking statistic. But honestly, for those of us who kind of are involved in the church and what's going on, it wasn't that shocking. If you think about it, when you really look at who identifies as Catholic and what they actually believe. But I think it did wake a lot of people up that, wow, we're in bad shape. We're in real bad shape. If 70% of your members of your church don't even believe one of the most central doctrines of the church, that's. That's bad. So this idea is, let's go ahead and overcome that also. It's. It's. They said it's kind of a response to Covid, that, like a lot of people, more that a lot of people stop going to mass after Covid. And so they want to, you know, bring those people back. So I think that's part of it as well. [00:07:11] One thing they don't say for the origin of it, but is the actual origin of it, is because the bishops decide to punt on denying communion to pro abortion politicians like Joe Biden. [00:07:23] That was what the big debate was on. They were writing a document, and they were talking about whether or not they wanted to include in the document. Some bishops want to include that we should not give communion to pro abortion politicians like Nancy Pelosi or Joe Biden. [00:07:38] And the bishops punted on that. They did not want to do that. And so this was kind of a response to it to say, okay, but we are going to do everything we can to encourage belief in the Eucharist. So that's the origins of how we came about to have this eucharistic revival and the Eucharistic Congress coming up now, I think the question is going to be, there's going to be a lot of media attention on this, at least in the catholic world. And I think there's going to be a problem in how we judge whether or not this was worthwhile. Remember, the original cost estimates for this was $28 million. I believe that's been cut down significantly from there. But we're still talking tens of millions of dollars to do this. If you look at the go to the Eucharistic Congress website, I mean, no expense has been spared. This is at major event centers, major convention centers. [00:08:34] They're bringing in speakers from all over. I mean, this cost a lot of money to put on. I mean, all the advertising, doing all this stuff. So it is definitely a event that's going to cost a lot. So the question isn't going to be necessarily in judging its success, how many people are coming, but what impact does it have? Because the fact is, I think it will have decent attendance already. Well, already, say at least 50,000 people have attended various events of the eucharistic pilgrimages across the country, and we're only halfway through those. So a lot of people are going to those. [00:09:08] And then it just was released yesterday. I think I saw this, where 40,000 people have already signed up for the five, the full five day pass at the congress. The congress is five days long. You can buy a day pass or a five day pass, and the five day pass, the normal price is $300. So 40,000 people have already signed up to come to this. And the largest venue of the congress only seats 50,000. So, I mean, we're talking. A lot of tickets have been sold. Now, some people might be surprised by this. Like, I know people, when they first announced it were like, oh, nobody's going to go this because the expense and all that stuff, I'm not surprised. And I'll tell you why. I mean, I worked for a diocese for five years. I kind of, I feel like I understand how the institutional church works. And by that, I mean, I'm not saying it's like a separate church from the real church or something like that, but the institutional church is really like. I just mean the institution itself, like the levers of power, the diocesan chanceries, the bishop, all the people who work for the bishop, for the diocese, who work for the parishes, the institutional church, when it gets behind something, you will guarantee attendance. We see that with the march for life. I mean, look at the march for life in Washington. DC. [00:10:29] When that became something that the institutional church, meaning most of the bishops and parishes, supported and wanted people to go to, it was guaranteed. You're going to get a lot of people there. Now, I'm not saying the people who go aren't sincere, don't really want to go or anything like that. I'm just saying is once it gets the endorsement from the bishops, from the priests and everybody, then it's like, okay, we're allowed to go to this. We not only are we allowed to go this, but we can get our youth group to raise money to go to it. We can promote it with our parishioners. We can make a big, we put it in the parish bulletins. We can put in the diocesan newspaper. We can make a big deal about this. The bishops will speak out and say, yes, you should go to this. When that happens, you're going to get tens of thousands of people at something just guaranteed. And so that alone, to me, isn't really enough. It's not a measure of success whether or not a lot of people go to that. I mean, there's been lots of well attended programs over the past, you know, 50 years. But would, I would argue, I mean, I think it's pretty obvious. It's not like we've gotten a stronger church because of it. It's not like because all of a sudden we've had a bunch of well attended conferences and conventions and programs. Now all of a sudden the catholic church is in a great shape. No, that's not the case. I mean, I would say, in fact, I would argue off the top of my head, I'm just thinking this off top of my head. Of all the major events in the catholic church in America over the past 50 years, I can only think of one that really had a true impact on the church, and that was World Youth Day in Denver in 1993. There's no question a lot of priestly vocations were born there. I mean, you hear this a lot from priests of a certain age. Yes, it was at Denver, 1993 that I really found my vocation. Discovered my vocation. I went to that world Youth Day and it was a big deal. [00:12:13] But other than that, all these events that we have there hasn't made a major impact on the church for the good. So again, attendance does not equate to success. So what is success then? What do we mean by success? If we say okay, when we look back on this in five years and we say okay, was the national three year, national eucharistic revival in the congress, was it successful success? I think, actually it's very simple. They had this because they're doing this because of that status. 70% don't believe in the real presence. If that number does not substantially change in five years, I don't see how you can say it's a success if five years from now, Pew research does another study, and they find it, like, 66% don't believe in the real presence. Well, I think it wasn't really a success. [00:13:07] I'm not saying there wasn't individual successes. Again, that's something important to remember when I say, like, a big conference doesn't really do much to move the needle. I'm not saying individual souls can't be impacted. I'm just saying, is it really having the impact it's advertised to have? I also think that another measure of success would just simply be mass attendance. Right now, mass attendance among self identified Catholics is pitiful. It's in the teens, I think. I mean, some people would argue it's, like, in the twenties. But if you look at all Catholics, I think it's closer in the teens if that hasn't gone up, because, again, that was another thing, was they said that after Covid, a lot of people stopped going. Well, are they coming back? I think those are the indicators of whether or not success now. So the question is, will it be, do I think it'll be successful? Now, I'm not one to just automatically say, no, it won't. I know some people might think I'm a curmudgeon. I might automatically be against it. But like I said, I thought world, a lot of people thought world Youth Day in Denver was going to be a big failure, and I don't think it was. [00:14:09] Will this be a success? I. I'm very skeptical. I'll be honest. I think it's possible. I'm very skeptical, and I base this on my own experiences working for a diocese. Here's the problem. [00:14:25] You can host a great event. You can do a men's conference, for example, where you have Scott Hahn, you have, like, other great speakers, and men are fired up. They're like, yes, I want to live my faith. This is great. [00:14:37] What happens the day after the event's over? I should say the Sunday after the event's over, they go to their parish, and that is where we lose them. I mean, to be blunt, and I saw this. This was one of the biggest frustrations I had when I was working for a diocese, was that it didn't matter what we did. Ultimately, we were sending them back to their parishes, their parishes where the faith was frankly not proclaimed or in a very lukewarm fashion, where the liturgy was very apathetic or very, not very inspiring, that the preaching was not very good, the catechesis was not very good. I mean, just everything about it was just lukewarm, and it led to a lukewarm faith. So somebody might go to an event and be like, this is great. But then you go back to your parish and it just, it doesn't equip them for really living in the world we live in today, for understanding our faith, for living out our faith, for being bold in it. And so I really feel like that's what I fear happens here, is people get fired up, they go to this congress, but then what do they do? They're going to go back to their parishes and are the parishes going to be any different than they were? [00:15:49] I also think the problem, and again, this is from experience of doing diocesan events, it's whether or not they. [00:15:58] The event itself, any institutionally approved eventually, is by its very nature compromised. [00:16:08] Any event that's approved by the institutional church in a really, like a major fashion, not just that they allow it, but that they're actually pushing it, is going to be compromised. Let me give you a perfect case in point at this eucharistic congress. On one of the breakout sessions, it will be a talk about synodality with Cardinal Cupich as the main speaker and a couple other bishop and a couple other people. Cardinal Cupich, remember, is the man who is trying, basically, he does not like adoration. He's not allowing adoration to happen when the eucharistic pilgrimage goes through the Archdiocese of Chicago. [00:16:45] This man is undermining faith in the real presence, left and right, and he's allowed to speak at this eucharistic congress. [00:16:52] Why? Because he's a cardinal of church. You can't, not if it's an institutionally approved event, you can't not let him come. You can't not feature a cardinal if he wants to speak. [00:17:03] But that just undermines it by having him there. You're undermining it. And that's the nature of these institutional church's events. They have to be compromised. They cannot really boldly say what needs to be said, and I'm going to explain what that needs to be said here in a minute. But they can't boldly say that. They have to go along with kind of the company line about, okay, what we really need to do is we just really need to speak more and talk more and that's really going to change things. We're going to ignore all the underlying causes of this lack of faith in the real presence. Instead, we're just going to say, hey, if we just tell you more and more, just repeat it over and over again, you're going to believe it. I saw on, Layla Lawler had a great article she wrote yesterday about Bishop Barron's mass, the mass video series. And she was saying this, how bishops seem to think that Catholics who don't believe in the real presence, it's their fault, and we just need to tell them more often and then they'll believe, don't change anything. How we do anything, don't, look, maybe how we do things as the cause, but instead, no, they're just big dummies. So we need to teach them better. [00:18:11] And that's what this, I mean, that's what a lot of these events are. Let's just say more. And that's going to somehow do it. [00:18:19] So I admit I'm skeptical because I know how these events work. I saw who the speakers are and listen, some of the speakers are fine people. I mean, I saw Scott Hahn speaking at breakout session. Trent Horne is speaking at breakout session. Other people that I'm sure are great Catholics. I'm not trying to act like every speaker's like cardinal Cupich, but they're not going to get anybody who is going to speak very strongly about the real causes. And also, and I'm going to bring this up. It was already put up on the screen. Once I bring this up, I have a, it says, I have a schedule for the congress, a byzantine divine liturgy mass in English, Mass in Spanish, a youth mass in vietnamese assurance, Malabar. Right. But no latin mass. [00:19:03] The joke is, unless that's the youth mass. Mass. Mass. I saw that, too. I saw that two rose, that, that there was no latin mass schedule. They have scheduled the various rites, various liturgies there, and I'm very happy they have some of the eastern liturgies there. I think it's great to give us exposure to them, to the wider church. [00:19:23] But why isn't there a traditional latin mass? Well, we know why there's not traditional latin mass. First of all, if they had one and approved, like a latin mass, a church latin mass said, I guarantee it would be packed. I don't care what church they put it in, it would be packed. [00:19:37] And they know that. [00:19:39] And that's what I'm saying about compromised events. It's compromised, meaning it can't be fully catholic. And really look at the reasons why Catholics don't believe in the real presence. It's not really going to dig deep into it. It's just going to be on the surface and involve itself in catechesis, cheerleading for why you have to believe in the Eucharist. And that's it. That's all it's going to be some emotional events with, with, with music. And I realize I sound pretty down on this, and I kind of feel bad that I do, but I've just. [00:20:11] Okay, I'm old enough. I've seen it. I've seen it now. I've experienced it. I've organized these things. [00:20:19] I just know how they end. I know how they go. [00:20:23] Nobody there is going to really say what the issues are. Now what are they then what can we. What would truly need to be done to have a true national eucharistic revival? [00:20:36] What would have to happen for it to be a true success? I don't think any things, these things will occur, but what should occur in order for that to happen? [00:20:46] What you'll notice is when I do, when I list these off, none of them cost any money. [00:20:52] We're spending tens of millions of dollars for just a big event and all this stuff to increase. They're spending their tens of millions of our dollars. Remember that. Remember their money comes from us. [00:21:05] So they're spending tens of millions of our dollars for an event that likely would have less impact than what I'm about to say, which wouldn't cost us a dime. The first thing I would say, the bishops would need to apologize for shutting down, mastering Covid and say, and promising never to do it again. [00:21:24] I mean, they kind of admit that this is a reason for our lack of faith in the mass and the Eucharist. Is the fact that people stop going after Covid. Why they stopped going because you bishops, your excellencies, your imminent, you literally said that mass is non essential. [00:21:42] You literally said that. [00:21:45] And by literal, I mean literal because by shutting it down, when we were shutting down non essential services, whereas essential essential services like Home Depot and Planned Parenthood stayed open, you were telling the faithful, mass is not essential. And guess what? The faithful listened. [00:22:01] Actions speak much louder than words. Your actions said that these things were non essential. The mass is non essential, and therefore people treated it like that. That's the biggest problem I see in how church leaders, officials, even, even lay officials and people like that, how they. The biggest problem in understanding how the faith is transmitted. [00:22:25] They think it's just talking. If we just talk enough, people will finally agree with us that's not how the faith is transmitted. Yes, talking is part of it, but the primary talking is between parent and child. Maybe pastor and flock as well. [00:22:41] It's not at catechism class or at a conference like that. [00:22:45] But talking, I would say, is maybe 5%, 10% of how the faith is handed on. The vast majority of it is simply going to mass and just living out the faith and things like that. But. So by shutting down mass during COVID the bishop said very clearly, mass is non essential. We've got to recover that. And I don't think we do that until we apologize, until the bishops, we. I didn't do it. [00:23:11] The bishop's apologists say we should not have shut down mass. It was a mistake and we won't do it again. We won't just obey the state. When they say, we don't want you to have mass, we're going to have it anyway. I mean, think about this. [00:23:25] The priest who basically had masses anyway, like they had private masses with the door unlocked, those are people we look up to now, aren't they? The priests who did everything they could to bring the Eucharist to people during COVID the lockdowns. They're the ones who we're always going to remember as the heroes of the faith. Nobody's going to look back and say, oh, look at those bishops, how heroic they were to shut down mass. No, they're going to say, we're going to. Catholics going to say, faithful Catholics going to say, in 100 years, look at those wonderful priests who, they brought the Eucharist to the people, even during lockdowns, even when they were told not to. Even by their bishop, they were told not to. So that's the first thing. Apologize for shutting down mass. Promise not to do it again. [00:24:08] Next is simply, we need to foster a better eucharistic piety during Mass. [00:24:16] Again, like I said, you pass on the faith much more by actions than by words. I mean, Lex Laurende, Lex Credende, how we worship is how we believe, and how we worship is more than just the words on the text of the page. I mean, those are very important, obviously, the prayers being said, but it's so much more than that. So, for example, we should encourage Catholics to dress better. I know that's going to sound like, wait a minute, what's that going to do with anything to some people? [00:24:42] But if you walk into mass and you see people are dressed nicely, that they're, that they're, you know, the men are in jackets, maybe in ties, the ladies are in dresses, people are dressed up. I'm not saying do it in a sense of like, you're pointing out people who are dressed, who aren't dressed like that and saying, you know, shame on you. But I am saying, like, if just people naturally were encouraged to dress like that through peer pressure, maybe through some nice words from the pastor about it, then you automatically know, okay, this is not just a social gathering. This is not a meeting of the Elks Club. Something different about this. It's like if the president has a dinner, a White House dinner, do you think people show up in flip flops and shorts? No, they dress up very nicely. Why? Because they're at the White House, at the president's dinner. Well, I mean, mass is the king of kings. It's the banquet of the king of kings. It's the holy sacrifice of mass. We dress up for it. So I think that would be one thing. Again, something doesn't cost anything. [00:25:42] Second would be, I mean, these aren't in any specific order, by the way. I just kind of wrote them down. [00:25:48] Another one would be get rid of eucharistic ministers. [00:25:52] I mean, the idea that just any Joe blow can, can take the Eucharist and hand it out to people like a Pez dispenser, that undermines eucharistic piety. It undermines belief in the real presence. [00:26:05] When you see only a clergyman with consecrated hands is able to hold, you know, hold on to the touch, the Eucharist, that says something. And that, of course, leads to the second. The next one, I was going to say, which is no communion in the hand. I don't want to get into stupid debates about, oh, in the early church, there is some communion in the hand. I mean, the fact is, is that communion hand was unheard of in the Middle Ages because they wanted to develop a eucharistic piety. And that's also the age in which the eucharistic piety just skyrocketed. [00:26:36] And so we see there's direct connection there. So nobody should be touching the Eucharist except for those with consecrated hands. That is the clergy. [00:26:46] And I think that would be another thing that would be a signal. This isn't just regular food. [00:26:51] This isn't a symbolic thing. This is really something different. It's so different that you actually have to be ordained. You have to have consecrated hands to even touch it. That seeps into the consciousness of all Catholics, but particularly young people growing up in the church. [00:27:09] Another thing that I would say is reinstitute ad orientum, ad or antim worship everywhere where you have the priest facing the same direction as the people leading people in worship. It shows that at mass, this is not a community gathering. It's not a. A talk given by somebody at the local hotel ballroom. This is the holy sacrifice of the mass. It tells you, okay, something very unique is happening here. This is heaven and earth coming together. This is the worship of the almighty God also. And so also, my list is no communion for pro abortion politicians. I mean, this should be a no brainer, but obviously it's not, because that sins are very single, that the Eucharist is not something to be trifled with. It's not something just given out like candy. [00:28:00] It is something for people, repentant sinners. It's not like that whole stupid thing about. It's not like, what was it Pope Francis said about. It's not like, you know, a prize for the worthy or something like that. It's not what we're saying. What we're saying is, you have to be a repentant sinner. All of us are sinners. So everybody receives Eucharist is a sinner. But the question is, are they repentant or not? And a pro abortion politician who does not repent of that is not. They're publicly sinning. They're publicly giving scandal. And so they should not be receiving Holy Communion. Bishop should not allow it. That would also send a very strong signal. [00:28:37] And obviously, the last thing I'm going to mention is there should be an embrace of the traditional latin mass. Now, I know we could argue we should just abolish the novus ordo, have the traditional latin mass, but I'm trying to be at least somewhat realistic on these. I mean, I know most of these will not happen, at least on any massive scale anytime soon, but just stop persecuting people who attend the latin mass. It's a hilarious thing that we have a situation where the bishops are. The hierarchy is upset that only 30% of Catholics believe in the real presence, and yet at the same time, they're persecuting those who attend a parish where almost 100% believe in the real presence. [00:29:17] I mean, it just makes no sense. You're persecuting those who believe in the real presence while you're lamenting the fact that Catholics don't believe in the real presence. It makes no sense. So embrace the TLM. Allow it to flourish. Allow it to be said as much as possible in as many places as possible, because there's no question that everything about the traditional mass fosters eucharistic. Piety. I mean, that's, there's, that's why it developed like it did over the ages. It didn't all. It wasn't a committee one day in, like, you know, 680 that said, okay, let's develop a liturgy that, you know, we like or will sound cool or something like that. No, it was over time, especially in the first few centuries, this, this development happened a lot more quickly, and then over time, it became more solidified. This idea of these things help foster our beliefs. [00:30:09] They support what we believe about the Eucharist, and so that's why we want to do it like that. So embrace the traditional. Ms. Least not try to shut it down. [00:30:19] But like I said, guess what? [00:30:21] They won't do these things. None of these things cost a dime. Not one of the things I listed will cost time. But I guarantee you, if you did them, the percentage of Catholics who believe in the real presence would skyrocket in comparison to just holding this eucharistic revival. [00:30:39] And that just, I mean, I just think this is such common sense, it almost doesn't even need to be argued. The question is, why don't they do these things? I think in most cases, it's weakness by the bishops. They know they'd be controversial. Yes. If you did this, there'd be some modernist boomer Catholics who would be all upset about it. How dare the priesthood turn his back on us? I want to give out communion to everybody. I don't want to have to receive it from father. I want to put it in my hands. [00:31:05] I mean, yes, you'll get that, but those screeching harpies, just ignore them, because what will happen is other. The good hearted Catholics will flock back to the church. They will believe in the real presence because they will see that we're serious about it. So I really do think that this is my underlying problem with the eucharistic revival. Not the eucharistic revival itself, but the fact that they're not doing all the things around that really should be done that don't cost anything. Because the fact is, this is like the 10th National Eucharistic Congress in America, in America's history. So it's not like eucharistic congresses are like some modernist post Vatican II thing. They're great. There's nothing like a eucharistic congress is great, but it needs to be surrounded by parishes in a church that really support what they're teaching at the congress. [00:31:57] That's the problem here. So I just want to, I kind of leave it here. But I just want to say I want the revival to succeed. I want the Congress to succeed. Obviously. I want more Catholics to believe in the real presence of Christ in Eucharistic. These are things I want. So I want to be a success. I hope it does help some souls. Like, I hope some people who go to this will really, their life will be changed. I really do hope that. And by the way, I am planning on going on one of the days of the, I think the Thursday of the Eucharistic Congress. If you're going and you see me come up and say hello and let me know how you're doing, let me know how you think the Congress is going. [00:32:34] I think what we really need to do as Catholics, though, instead of spending tons of money, I think what we need to do as Catholics, individual Catholics, you and me, we need to pray and do penance for, to bring about a true and long lasting revival, pray and do penance that more Catholics might believe the eucharistic, the real presence and practice the eucharistic piety from the bishops, from the pope, from the bishops to priests, the laity, that we really take the Eucharist seriously in our masses, in our liturgies, and it shows by how we act during them, how we treat the rubrics, how we do all these things. That's what needs to be done in order to have a true eucharistic revival. [00:33:15] Okay, I'll leave it there until next time, everybody. God love.

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