Should Bishops Ignore the Vatican? (Guest: Peter Kwasniewski)

June 28, 2024 01:02:29
Should Bishops Ignore the Vatican? (Guest: Peter Kwasniewski)
Crisis Point
Should Bishops Ignore the Vatican? (Guest: Peter Kwasniewski)

Jun 28 2024 | 01:02:29

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Eric Sammons

Show Notes

The reign of Pope Francis has revealed a crisis in the relationship between bishops and the pope. From the sacking of Bishop Strickland to the Vatican micromanagement of dioceses and even parishes, what is the proper relationship between Peter and the other apostles?
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Episode Transcript

[00:00:10] Speaker A: The reign of Pope Francis has revealed a crisis in the relationship between bishops and the pope, from the sacking of Bishop Strickland to the Vatican, micromanagement of diocese and even parishes. What is the proper relationship between Peter and the other apostles? That's what we're going to talk about today on crisis point. Hello, I'm Eric. Sam is your host, editor in chief of Crisis magazine. Before we get started, smash that like button. Subscribe to the channel, let other people know about it. So our guest today needs no real introduction. Doctor Peter Kwasneski. He is the man who writes or edits a book every week. And so the one we're going to be mostly kind of referring to today is called unresolved tensions in papal episcopal relations. Essays occasioned by the deposition of Bishop Joseph Strickland. I have it right here. Wonderful book. I'll make sure I put a link to it so people can buy it, you know, can get to quickly. And we're not really talking about the book today. We're. As much as we're talking about the issues related to the book and how they apply to what's going on today. I mean, obviously the book, as it says in the subtitle, it was occasioned by the sacking of Bishop Strickland. But there's been so much tension between the papacy and the episcopacy over the past number of years. I mean, there's a lot we can cover here. So first of all, just welcome. Peter, I appreciate you coming on. [00:01:26] Speaker B: Thank you, Eric. Always a pleasure. [00:01:28] Speaker A: Why don't we first just start, though, with the sacking of Bishop Strickland? Happened last November. I had his excellency on a couple weeks ago and just kind of talk about what was so crazy about that. Like a lot of people, Catholics think, oh, well, the pope's in charge, he can fire and hire bishops. So no big deal. But really it was a radical move and so kind of explain to us why that was so radical. [00:01:51] Speaker B: Yes. So basically what we have to understand is that the church teaches and teaches consistently that the bishops, no less than the pope, are successors of the apostles. That's a big deal right there. Just sort of let that sink in. Right? Successors of the apostles. They are the apostles in our midst. And that the bishops rule by a kind of divine right. I don't mean that in the protestant divine right of king sense, but they have, they've been appointed by the pope and they have to be consecrated. But once they're in possession of that episcopal office, they rule and they teach, and they sanctify with a right proper to them. It's not like, they're not like branch managers hired by the CEO of a corporation who can hire and fire at will. That's not the way the church has ever thought about it. And in fact, throughout church history, some of the points of tension which have arisen from time to time between the episcopacy and the papacy have precisely to do with an overreach, either on the part of the one or on the part of the other, right? So sometimes it's the bishops who overreach. For example, you have this phenomenon called conciliarism, which is a heresy. It's been condemned. And conciliarism is the view that the supreme authority in the church is a council of bishops, right, of which the pope would be a member, but he has no special status. That's conciliarism. There's also the error of Gallicanism, which is a quasi political error because it sort of means, like the bishops of a national area, like France, Gaul, in the old way of speaking, that they would be the supreme authorities within their own territory. And unfortunately, we've seen some of that returning with the german sonatal way. I mean, the german bishops are basically acting as if they were Gallicanists, you know, like we're in charge of our local church. The popes have also overreached at times. There have been times when popes have tried to dictate to bishops, this is the way you're going to rule your diocese. You're going to establish or disestablish this religious community or this monastery. You're going to appoint my favorite nephew into one of your posts, you know, and the, and the bishops have had to say no. With all due respect, your holiness, this is going too far. You don't have the authority to do whatever you want. So I think that, in a way, what we've seen in history is a growing awareness that the pope, he is a monarch, right? But he's not an absolute monarch. He's a constitutional monarch. I like that expression. That's the way Martin Mosebach puts it. What he means by that is the pope is subject to the constitution of the church. There are certain rights and responsibilities, duties, obligations that the pope has given the nature of the Church of Christ, that he can't simply sidestep because he doesn't feel like it. He's not omnipotent, he's not absolute in that sense. [00:04:50] Speaker A: Let me just be clear about when you say constitution, because I think some people might think you're just saying, like, canon law, but I think what you're saying is not really just strict, because, of course, the pope could change canon law. So what do you mean when you say, like, a constitution of the church? [00:05:06] Speaker B: Exactly what I mean. There is the divine constitution of the church, right? What our Lord Jesus Christ wills for his church, in terms of what her common good is, what her sacramental structure is, what is the role of tradition in the church? This is also part of the divine constitution of the church. And I don't just mean scripture and tradition as revelation, as divine revelation, but I also mean the normative value and function of tradition. Of. Of. I hand on what I have received that principle from St. Paul, tradi di quodet accepi, that very important principle which is fundamental to Catholicism. So that's what I mean. I don't mean a human constitution. And in fact, Ratzinger, Benedict XVI made this very clear when he said on one occasion, this was December 22, 2005, I think it was. He said, the church doesn't just give itself a constitution the way that, say, a revolution can happen in France, and suddenly we're writing up a new constitution, or as it happened, in the constitutional convention in the United States, or what would become the United States. Right? No, the church can create laws, human laws, for itself, for smooth governance. But there's a divine law, and there's also natural law that are prior to human law. And, in fact, St. Thomas says human law must be based on those prior laws, must be an expression of them, or else it's invalid. Right. And that also means, by the way, and this is very important, it comes up in one of the most important chapters in this book that we're. That we're sort of talking about, at least peripherally, there's a chapter in here by Philip Campbell called in what sense is the pope above canon law? And what he shows there, using some very important canonical authorities that everybody would acknowledge as authorities, that the pope is above canon law in one sense, but not in another. He's above it in the sense that he can modify it, but when it exists, and as long as it exists, he is bound by it. He's bound by it simply for the sake of the good of the society. Right? You can't have a ruler who's just flagrantly, you know, and flippantly violating law. That's. That's. That's terrible for the good of the community. And that gets us to Bishop Strickland. Um, I'm going to. [00:07:15] Speaker A: Just real quick. He also couldn't modify canon law in a way that contradicts divine law as well. Correct. Like, if he wanted to add some canon that, I don't know, that, like, a woman could be a bishop or something like that. He couldn't actually do that. [00:07:29] Speaker B: Yeah, exactly. Maybe it's more relevant to talk about deacons. [00:07:32] Speaker A: Yeah, right, right. Exactly. [00:07:34] Speaker B: Yeah. But. But the. With Bishop Strickland, there are many problems, and the book goes into them in some detail. It has a really fine essay by Father Gerald Murray, who, just as a canonist, just calmly, you know, how calm he is. He deserves, calmly shows that the entire procedure that is outlined in canon law for the disciplining or punishment of any cleric, especially a bishop, was not followed at all. In fact, it was violated in repeated ways. There was never a documented accusation of, these are the things you've done wrong. These are the reasons why we think you ought to step down, or why we're going to make you step down. There was never a trial. There should be a canonical trial. I mean, there's a whole setup, just like there is in secular legal codes. And all of that was run roughshod over by Pope Francis and his department heads at the Vatican, and they basically just simply yanked him out. It was an exercise of exactly that kind of absolutist, arbitrary authority that is rightly protested against. [00:08:48] Speaker A: Now, in the case of Bishop Strickland, I think, if I remember correctly, when it happened, you were pretty much just publicly saying that you thought Bishop Strickland just simply should not obey that deposition, that he shouldn't just go quietly into the night, so to speak. [00:09:04] Speaker B: Yes. [00:09:05] Speaker A: So let's talk practically, then. What do you. I mean, obviously, I think we both acknowledge we're sidelined here making commentary. We're nothing. You know, we're not the actual Bishop himself, so we're just simply saying what we think would be the best way forward. You know, neither of us are acting like we're, you know, know, all or everything like that, but at the same time, what do you think practically he should have done? And what would have been the actual consequences if he had just said no? Because I haven't gotten a canonical trial. Whatever. I'm just simply not going to leave. [00:09:38] Speaker B: Yes. Yes. Well, that is something in. In this book, that the last three appendices are pieces in which I argue what you're summarizing, and I put them as appendices because they've been published elsewhere, but they were important to include, because all the other essays in the book. All the other authors refer to them in one way or another. So it seemed like a convenient thing to put them there and to have, you know, the cross references. But my argument basically boils down to this. Although the, as I said before, although the pope appoints bishops, he's not the origin of their authority. God is the origin of their authority. Just like, by the way, the church teaches that if there's a democracy that elects a ruler, they don't endow him with the power, the authority of rulership. God does once they've chosen him. Right. The teaching of the church is all authority comes from God. That's St. Paul in the letter to the Romans. We won't go into that. That's a political philosophy question. The argument that John Lamont makes here at great length against Jose Antonio Areta, who's. So there's a dialectic in this book. There's disagreement among the authors and not only taking one position, but John Lamont argues that because the successors of the apostles have their authority by divine right, the pope cannot arbitrarily take it away. He doesn't have the authority to do that. And such an act would be null and void. That is, Bishop Strickland would still be the bishop because there was no. Because there was a violation of justice done. And if he had remained in his office, then basically he would have said, I'm still the bishop here, and I'm the bishop of Tyler, Texas, and people report to me, I'm still in governance of this. And until and unless there's a documented case and a canonical trial, I'm remaining in my place. Now, of course, that would create a mess. There's no question about it. [00:11:33] Speaker A: Yeah. [00:11:34] Speaker B: One thing I want make a mess. [00:11:36] Speaker A: Yes. He said he wants us to make a mess real quick. I want to take one step back, though. I feel like I'm not as well read on this as you are, but I feel like I have read catholic theologians in the past, preconciliar, who have argued that bishop's authority does come through the pope. Aren't there some catholic theologians who have argued that in the past that basically it does come through the pope? It's not just a matter of the pope appointing him, but actually they're more exercising the authority of the pope kind of in a certain area, yes. [00:12:10] Speaker B: Well, yes and no. The first point you made is true. The majority opinion, in fact, of catholic theologians is that the pope's supreme jurisdiction endows him with the power to appoint others to the jurisdiction of whatever see or whatever diocese he chooses for them, and therefore he is on that theological opinion, which is the majority one. He is not the source of their authority once they're installed, but he's the one who grants them the jurisdiction, so he has to grant them the jurisdiction. It's like saying, okay, I send you to this diocese, I authorize you to rule this diocese, but once you're there, the bishop is actually ruling in his own name as the, as the shepherd of that diocese. He's not. And that's where I'm disagreeing. He's not simply like a vicar of the pope who's sort of representing the pope like a papal nuncio. That's something that Vatican II and other sources reject, that the bishops are just vicars of the pope. So it's, it's. That is true. But as with the question of canonizations, I just want to make a quick parallel here. I edited a book called are canonizations infallible? Which is another. It's another collection. [00:13:27] Speaker A: I liked that one a lot. [00:13:28] Speaker B: Yeah. And again, that book has some representatives in it of the majority position. Father Thomas Crean. [00:13:36] Speaker A: That's what I liked about it, was that, like, I didn't have a strong opinion one way or the other going into it, and I actually still kind of don't. I lean one way, but reading both sides, and that's what I think this book, the book you're talking about now to the unresolved tensions, does, is it gives a, tries to give a fair hearing. [00:13:53] Speaker B: Exactly. And so with the canonizations book, some of the authors just acknowledge, and I do, too, that the majority opinion is that canonizations are infallible, but that's not solemnly taught by the church. And there is, therefore, a debate that can be had between the majority and the minority positions. The minority saying canonizations are not infallible. And in my opinion, the minority arguments are stronger. In that case, there's a, there's a wonderful piece in there by Bruneiro Giardini, who is a great roman theologian, died just a few years ago, in which he lays out the case for the non infallibility of canonizations. And I think personally, this is a very important question because there are a lot of Catholics who are really struggling with certain canonizations, and we don't need to get into that. But that's just to say that similarly, in this question of the jurisdiction of bishops, there is a majority position that the pope is the one who has to grant the jurisdiction. And there's a minority position, which Lamont argues here, I think very well at least in a way that would challenge people, would provoke people to rethink the question wherever they fall, the minority opinion that the pope can choose the bishop, but Jesus Christ is the one who gives him the jurisdiction. And what makes this even more interesting, it kind of, you know, the plot thickens here, is that Vatican II appears to teach this minority position, which was espoused by theologians like Congar, who. And so we're in this funny situation right now where traditionalists generally have a very negative view of Vatican II, right? And yet it's the traditionalists in the church who are getting hammered by this arbitrary, absolutist papal governance right now, given who is the pope and his agenda. And so suddenly, the positions that, you know, people like us used to argue when John Paul II was pope or Benedict XVI was like, rally to the pope. Everybody must obey the pope. You know, we were all hyper papalists back then, in a way, or at least ultramontanists. And I think that we've been chastened by experience. I think we've been really forced to step back and say, is it healthy, basically, to have an absolute monarchy like this? I mean, wouldn't our lord have planned better for the church knowing that every once in a while there's going to be some kind of renegade pope, whether it's a morally renegade pope, of which we've had quite a few, unfortunately, or even a doctrinally unreliable pope like Honorius or vigilius or, you know, well, anyway, so it seems like our lord has. He must have provided in his divine constitution a way to survive bad papacys. Right, right. And I think part of that is just recognizing this, the. The genuine authority of the bishops as shepherds of their own flocks who can defend the needs and the rights of their flocks. Right. The bishop can say, I know my sheep. I know my sheep. They don't, they don't deny that the Second Vatican Council wasn't a legitimate ecumenical council. They don't deny the validity of the novus ordo. They don't think that it's that, you know, they believe that transubstantiation happens there. They are peaceable people. They're not making trouble. They're actually flourishing and vigorous. And I want them in my diocese, and I'm not going to hammer them, and so I'm going to protect them. That's my duty as the shepherd, to protect them from the wolves, even if, tragically, that wolf is the pope. [00:17:12] Speaker A: Right. And I think, yeah. So let's move on to the traditional latin mass, because right now, we're in the midst of rumors, very strong rumors, that there's going to be a further crackdown under traditional latin mass. The possibility now is that's most talked about is that it will basically be 100% banned outside the clay Zay community, St. Peter Institute, Christ the king. So if you go to a TLM, the diocesan priest, or even a religious order priest, celebrates outside of those institutes, then it will be shut down. And also, the rumor is that bishops will not be allowed to celebrate the latin mass. They won't be able to give indults to anybody. And so how is this. We. A lot of people have talked about this issue, you know, just the rumors and stuff. But how does this directly relate to what we're talking about with the episcopal papal relationship and how bishop should react to it if it happens? [00:18:16] Speaker B: Yes. Well, you know, I just want to mention some really wonderful things I've been reading in this new book from, from bishop. [00:18:23] Speaker A: You already got a copy of it? I haven't gotten a copy yet, yes. [00:18:26] Speaker B: Come on. Is it for sale yet? [00:18:29] Speaker A: No, but I should if you. [00:18:30] Speaker B: Oh, no. Okay. [00:18:32] Speaker A: Now it comes out in a. Next month. [00:18:34] Speaker B: Oh, okay. So this is an advanced copy that I have. Flee from heresy. [00:18:38] Speaker A: You know, the right people. [00:18:39] Speaker B: Peter, a catholic guide to ancient and modern errors. And there's some really striking things in, in this book. So, for example, to answer your question, he has a question here. What powers do bishops have in their own dioceses? And he and Bishop Schneider answers, they hold full legislative, administrative, and judiciary power. That is, they have within their respective dioceses the same direct, complete and personal power that the pope exercises over the whole church, although they cannot eliminate, omit, or change what has been promulgated for the universal church. And then he gives a quotation from lumen gentium. And then he also points out elsewhere, he has a question. Is the pope obliged to faithfully maintain the church's traditional liturgical rites? And he answers, yes. The early medieval papal oath affirms, I promise to keep inviolate the discipline and the liturgy of the church as I have found them and as they were transmitted by my holy predecessors. And the papal oath decreed by the Council of Constance, session 39, ratified by Pope Martin van Echoes, I will follow and observe in every way the rite handed down of the ecclesiastical sacraments of the Catholic Church. And then finally, can a pope abrogate a liturgical rite of immemorial custom in the church? Bishop Schneider answers, no, just as a pope cannot forbid or abrogate the apostles creed or Niceno Constantinopolitan creed or substitute a new formula for them. Neither can he abrogate traditional millennium old rites of mass and the sacraments or forbid their use. This applies as much to eastern as to western rights. So that, at least partly part ways answers your question. I consider, I mean, as you know, from my book true obedience and from my book bound by truth, I have argued exhaustively, and so have many others, that the pope simply does not have the authority to abrogate an immemorial, venerable liturgical rite of the Catholic Church, either eastern or western. He simply. It's simply not within his remit. It's completely outside of his remit. When you look at what popes have said over the centuries about the importance of handing on what the church has passed down and the importance of opposing heretics who have attacked the liturgy of the church, you realize this is very much outside the remit of the pope to abolish or forbid a traditional liturgical rite. It's up for discussion whether a pope has the authority to institute new rights. I mean, really new rights, not just like a new blessing for automobiles, but something, you know, more like the novus Ordo. That's. That's a. I think that's a controversial question and hasn't been evaluated nearly enough, but it's starting to be. I think Pope Francis is agitating that. But it's one thing to create a new right. It's another thing to abrogate or abolish a traditional one. You know, that's not done. That's never been done. It's never even been attempted. Paul Vinna didn't do it, although he made everybody feel as if they couldn't use the old missal, but he never abrogated it. And just sort of fast forwarding. Benedict XVI said in some more pontificum, it has not been abrogated and neither could it be forbidden or declared harmful. Right. So I think here we're dealing with a serious case of arbitrary papal overreach in a way that's very damaging to the common good. Can you imagine these flourishing dust and parishes with hundreds Catholics, so many families, so many vocations, in many cases, you know, and they're just told, well, no, you can't worship the way that your, that your forefathers worshiped, the way that the saints worshiped. You can't do that anymore. That's. That's. That's illegal. It's absurd. It's absurd on the face of it. And this is why I argue and many others in others in this, in this book, unresolved tensions argue that the bishops need to put their foot down and say, not in my diocese. And if you say, well, what's going. Okay, well, I'll just leave it at that. [00:22:39] Speaker A: Yeah, so we'll get to that in a second. Kind of what we think would happen if they did that, I think. So what kind of liturgical control does a bishop have in his diocese? And I want to give a few different kind of examples and then kind of, you could explain what you think could be done or couldn't be done. So, for example, can a bishop make changes to the, the novus ordo, for example? Could he say, okay, we're going to actually add, we're going to change these prayers a little bit. We're going to maybe add this additional, read something to it, you know, a prayer to, or something like that. Could he, could he say, I'm going to actually create a new right for my people? Because we're, you know, we're a, you know, we have a unique situation. Wherever someone actually, we're going to write up a new right from scratch. Could he say, I'm not going to. I'm going to let the traditional latin mass go, even if the continue to celebrate, even if the Vatican says not, or I'm going to abrogate it, even if the Vatican says, you can continue to do it. So you see where I'm kind of saying, like, what are the delineations of authority a bishop has over the liturgy in his? Because he is, I know he isn't on some level, he is kind of the master of the liturgy because that's the wrong word. He's a servant of it, but he is the kind of the liturgical leader, so to speak, of his diocese. So how does that work out? [00:24:00] Speaker B: Yeah, no, it's a great question. I mean, I think what we have to remember is two things. First of all, when we speak of the hierarchy of the church, we use that expression because it is a hierarchy. The lower members do have to remain in union in the right way with the upper members. And so if there's anyone in the church who has authority to make laws about the liturgy, it would be the pope more than the bishops. And if the pope makes a universal law that's within his remit, then, then the bishops do have to follow that right. That is to say, they can't just be rogues or renegades who say, well, we don't like the novus ordo, so we're just going to invent a local enculturated right, you know, the right of Cincinnati or whatever, you know, and it's going to be our own thing with bongo drums, and we're just going to do it. They can't do that. They can't create a new right. If the pope can't create a completely new right ab ovo ex novo, then affortiori, a bishop can't do that either. He has much less authority than the pope has in that sense. But similarly, if, you know, if the, but the other principle, I said there are two principles. One is hierarchy, the other is tradition. Tradition is good. It's amazing that we live in a time so just as it's amazing we live in a time where we have to say there are men and women and only, and men are men and women are women, and a man can't be a woman and a woman can't be a man and only a man and a woman can get married. I mean, it's like, it's like we're at the ABC level. We're in a world of imbeciles and madmen, and we're saying abcs, trying to get them to read ABC. Right. Well, similarly, it's amazing that in the Catholic Church, we should have to say tradition is good, right? Tradition is good, worthy of protection, worthy of reverence, worthy of transmission, inherently worthy of it, right? Not, it's not something that has to be studied carefully and you have to figure out, oh, is it, is it really okay to kneel for holy communion and receive on the tongue? No, we've been doing that for over a thousand years. Right. And for all kinds of good reasons. Of course it's a good thing. And so when you bring the principle of tradition in, that's the other break, so to speak, on, on the velocity of this vehicle, right. Whether papal or episcopal. That's why you can't just abolish the old rite. So if the pope says respect tradition, that's what he's supposed to say, then the bishop can't say, I don't like tradition. I'm not going to respect tradition. No. And he has to follow it. Has to follow tradition, and he has to follow the pope urging him to do that. But if you get to, there are some gray areas here. How much can a bishop legislate regarding the liturgy in his own diocese? Well, at very least, he has to legislate within the boundaries of more authoritative legislation. So, for example, a bishop couldn't remove readings from the mass. He couldn't add, you know, John Denver instead of the responsorial psalm or whatever. He can't do that. Kind of thing. It's against the universal rules called the general instruction of the Roman Missal. If we're talking about the novus ordo, right. He has to follow the general instruction. And incidentally, though, bishops have been trying, and the bad bishops have been trying, have been violating liturgical law all over the place. So, for example, you have somebody like Blaise Cupich in Chicago telling his priests they're not allowed to celebrate ad orientum, right? Well, says who? The general instruction, as I proved in an article called the normativity of adoriented worship in the ordinary form. It's from several years ago at new literature movement. You know, I proved that according to the missal itself, that the novus ordo mass is to be celebrated ad orientem. It's done versus populum, basically by custom. So if there's anything a bishop ought to legislate, he ought to legislate that everyone do it ad orientem and not versus populum. And so this is the kind of thing where yet once you get into the weeds, you can see that you have to really be knowledgeable about the whole sort of library of liturgical legislation. And it's a big library. I've got it in my. In my basement here. [00:28:03] Speaker A: I think. I think a lot of the errors we see among Catholics about this come across from a very. Sometimes a very american, like, literalist, like, legal tradition. You kind of see among Protestants with the way they interpret, you know, sola scriptura and things like that. It's like, okay, because what you just said makes sense, but I think I could hear them saying, well, you just said a bishop can't violate the universal norm. Well, what if the pope makes the universal norm that the novus ordo is the only roman right. You can't celebrate anything else. You just said that they can't violate that. Yet you also say that a bishop can't abrogate. He has to allow it still, or he should disobey that. And I. And correct me if I'm wrong, but as I see it, it's like, it's that key point you mentioned, which was tradition, which isn't always like a written down set of rules. The reality is that the church has celebrated what we call today the traditional latin mass, as it is essentially for over 1000 years. And it has. And that fact alone is actually a law in a sense. I know it's not my term, but it should be seen as a law, as a break, at the very least, of, like, okay, that very fact means it just can't be something that's discarded by a pope or a bishop. And so. But that's not written down anywhere. It's not like there's a. I know you have, like Pius fifth, I think it was. Who know. Who said, it can't be, you know, it's an immoral sacrifice, whatever, like that liturgy. But the point is, it's not actually written down strictly as, okay, this can never be abrogated because it's been around for a thousand years. That's just kind of a catholic sense that we have. Just like, you couldn't ban the rosary. I know you've used that example before, that it's not like there's a rule or in canon law says we must allow Catholics to pray the rosary. It just simply. It's because it's been prayed by millions of Catholics over a thousand years now, almost, that it simply is now. It just can't be abrogated. The pope has no authority to say, you can't pray the rosary. If you did that, you could just say, well, I'm not going to ignore that. So does that make sense? What I'm saying is that what you're saying? [00:30:24] Speaker B: It does. But I think we need to be. We need. We need to. We need to recognize also that it's not just an unspoken rule or a kind of sense that we have. There's a big paper trail on this question, both in papal papal writings and also in the evidences of the universal, ordinary magisterium of the church. And this is a concept. It sounds very technical. You know, the terminology itself comes from the 19th century, but basically, the ordinary. The universal, ordinary magisterium is what all the bishops of the church have taught throughout all the history of the church. And how do you find out what that is? Well, I mean, there's, you know, there isn't a handy dandy, you know, directory that just tells you this is all the ordinary, universal magisterium. So you have to look for signs of it, you have to look for evidence. And one of the evidences is that they've never taught otherwise, or if somebody has taught otherwise, he's been condemned for it. And so another great piece of evidence, and really the most concrete one of all, is to look at the history of catechisms, all the different catechisms that have been issues. And, you know, there's this amazing project, tradiveox, which is behind me. Right, exactly. Being put on, you know, published by Sofia Institute Press, edited by Aaron Seng, our good friend. And the reason it's important to look at catechisms is that you have hundreds of catechisms going for hundreds of years from hundreds of different bishops that all teach the same thing. They all teach, for example, that the death penalty is legitimate, right? That is evidence of the universal, ordinary magisterium, which is, guess what? Infallible. So the validity and legitimacy of the death penalty is part of the catholic faith. It's actually part of divine revelation, as Ed Fazer and Joseph Becsett demonstrate. And therefore, Pope Francis is simply wrong about the death penalty. And I bring that up because it's such a glaring example where somebody would say to you, well, Pope Francis has changed the catechism, and we all have to fall in line with this. And Dignitat's infinita says that death penalty is always against human dignity. No, sorry, that's wrong. Error out of bounds. Try again. Right. That's. That's the attitude of a proper Catholic. [00:32:35] Speaker A: It's not Pierre Kwasniewski saying it. That's the key. They're like, oh, you're just like a Protestant. You're just saying, you know, you're putting your personal judgment over the. And so what you're saying is, no, you have, like, hundreds of catechisms to tell you that, that this is what the church teaches. So. And the same thing applies, in a sense, to the traditional mass, how it's been practiced in, over the centuries. [00:32:56] Speaker B: Yes. And it's interesting, by the way, I just. I have to refer to this Bishop Snyder book again, rub it in some more. So he asks at one point, this is page 100. Can a layman's sensus Fidei sense of the faith ever lead him to reject a teaching of the clergy? Great question. [00:33:16] Speaker A: Right? [00:33:16] Speaker B: Yeah. Yes. Alerted by his senses, Fidei, the lay faithful may deny assent even to the teachings of legitimate pastors when these appear evidently contrary to right faith or morals, or undermine their integrity. St. Paul warned even of bishops who would teach error as ravening wolves. Acts 2029, formulating this principle for both clergy and lay faithful, even if we, or an angel from heaven, should proclaim to you a gospel contrary to what we proclaimed to you, let that one be accursed, as we have said before. So now, I repeat, if anyone proclaims to you a gospel contrary to what you received, let that one be accursed. Galatians one eight, nine. Then his next question is exactly what you said. Isn't this sinful disobedience, descent from the magisterium, and a form of Protestantism? That's the next question. And he answers is a short answer. No. Rather, than treat oneself as the ultimate criterion of truth, which is a form of Protestantism. The faithful Catholic, faced with a disturbing yet quote, unquote authorized teaching, merely defers to the superior authority of the universal, perennial, traditional teachings of the church, rejecting what departs from it. Now, obviously there's more that we would have to discuss about that, but it seems to me, getting back to this universal, ordinary magisterium, you also find innumerable testimonies to the veneration that we should have towards our traditional liturgical rights and our duty, our obligation to gratefully receive them and pass them on. That's not something that we're just making up. That trads are just making up since the 1960s. It's not the case. I also wrote this thing called the boundedness of the pope, the pope's boundedness to tradition. It's an essay. It's online. People can find it. I'll send you a link later where I give many, many documentary witnesses to this attitude. And the theologians of the church have also enforced this attitude or said, this is part of the catholic faith. So it's definitely something very deep in our tradition that the pope cannot treat the liturgy as his personal toy, to use Bishop Mozart's memorable expression. [00:35:24] Speaker A: This actually leads me now to the next question, because we're talking about, like a layperson kind of just saying, sorry, your holiness, but you're wrong. Like on the death penalty, something like that. Let's say we're in a situation where the traditional mass, the rumors are all true and they happen, and now there's no traditional mass available to some faithful. There's no fraternity nearby, there's no institute or whatever. And, but he finds out, okay, there is a priest who is going to celebrate it underground, not with the permission. In this scenario, your bishop has said, yes, we follow the pope on this. No, no traditional masses are allowed in my diocese. And so now you have your, the universal pastor, your own pastor, and the bishop saying, you know, you can't. But there's this. You find out about this underground, so to speak, mass being celebrated, and it's underground. Now, I know people like to compare it to England in the 16th century, and there are some parallels, but it's not the state, because I think every Catholic would agree. If the state says, you can't go to mass, you can still go to mass, obviously you should. But here's a case where your legitimate pastor, the legitimate universal pastor, saying, no, you can't go this. And then, but you find out, and you should, you go, and what is your defense of going or not going to it. And by the way, also for my hypothetical, not a state of incontinence priest, something like that, it's going to. They're going to mention the Francis and your bishop in their, in the canon, all that. So. [00:36:53] Speaker B: Yeah. Thank you for that clarification. Yeah. You know, it's a. This, if this happens, if this document happens, and I. It could happen because Pope Francis is so unpredictable and he's so volatile, and he goes back and forth and he does all kinds of things. But he did, unfortunately. I mean, tradition, gustotes, if you read it three years ago, he said he was going to phase out the old math. So, I mean, it's not as if we should be. We are upset because we should be upset, but we shouldn't be surprised that this is, that this is in the works whether it happens or not. So it is, if it happens, it is going to lead to a terribly messy situation. I mean, there's just no, there's no way around that. And basically, what I've described in my book, bound by truth and what you can read in something like Eve Sharon's just newly released history of traditionalism, which is a fascinating book. The traditional movement exists because of what I would call material disobedience to unlawful orders or directives from the hierarchy, but formal obedience to catholic tradition in its fullness, which the popes always used to defend and used to pass on. And so it, it's. And the reason why there was an indult under John Paul II is because these pesky traditionalists would not go away and they wouldn't give up and they wouldn't stop, and they would. And they kept doing their masses, even in basements and, you know, and in barns and in abandoned churches and whatever they could find. And the reason why there was some more pontificum is because Benedict XVI, who had lived through all of this and had thought about it deeply, he realized there is something wrong with this picture. We need to let these Catholics have the liturgical tradition. We should not penalize them for it. We shouldn't treat them as second class, second tier citizens in the church. We should just acknowledge that what they love is worthy of love and worthy of respect and worthy of transmission. And it's also going to benefit the whole church because we took a turn too far. And this, this is Rotzinger's thinking, not mine. But his thinking is there was a turn too far away from tradition after Vatican II. And we need the gravitational force. We need the anchoring effect of the presence of tradition in the church to revitalize the novus Ordo. That's exactly what he thought. He thought that. And this is exactly what happened with the young clergy. They took up the ball, they learned how to celebrate the old mass, and then when they came back to the novus ordo, you know, and, you know, I'm not a fan of the novus Ordo. I think it shouldn't. Shouldn't exist. But when they came back to it, they wanted suddenly to do gregorian chant and. And they wanted to do some Latin. They wanted to do. To do it adorientem and with incense and with, you know, with all kinds of beauty. Okay. Smells and bells. They're not everything, but they're something, right? There's certainly part of catholic tradition, too. And I think this is that this was the program of Benedict XVI. It was patient. It was prudenthenne. He was trying not to cause another revolution by changing too much too fast. And so, long story short. Yes, I think that Catholics should find that if they're already going to the latin mass and they recognize it for what it is and its importance in their lives and in the life of the church, they should keep going to it, whatever that takes. Whether that means the society of St. Pius X, whether it means an underground or independent chapel, as long as it's not state of a contest, you know, whatever that means. They need to do what the original traditionalists did in the seventies. Otherwise, we're not going to have a sumorum pontificum 2.0. And if somebody says to me that sounds like you're saying that people should do evil so that good may result. No, I don't think that they're doing evil. I think the ones who are doing evil are the pope and the bishops in this case. Right. As far as, like, all the messy questions that arise, like absolution and marriage and so on, I go into those things in bound by truth, in more detail. I mean, we'd be here forever if we tried to cover every one of these questions. But the other thing, of course, that people can do if their conscience bothers them about, you know, following their. Following a diocesan priest into a kind of exile. I understand why some people would be bothered by that. Maybe they just. In my opinion, it would be that they haven't seen yet what's at stake and how important it is for us to support our clergy in holding on to the traditional mass. But they could go to an eastern rite. An east. An eastern catholic rite. I love the byzantine rite. It's not my. Right. It's not my preference, but it's valid and it's traditional and it's beautiful. Right. And it's very nourishing. So you could do that, obviously, if you had the anglican ordinariat. That's also not my. My cup of tea, so to speak. But I. Again, I would go to that if it was a choice between that and the novus ordo, or they could. I mean, this is easy to say and hard to do, but they could think about relocating to a friendlier place, a place with a fraternity parish or an institute parish or even a society parish. So this is, for me, the number one principle is that we, as Catholics, need to adhere to our traditional lex Orandi, Lex Credendi, lex Vivendi. We have to do that. That is. And if we see what's at stake, we realize it's not just about a liturgical preference, it's about the entire religion. Everything is connected to this. And if people want to see why that's the case, they should just check out my book, the once and future roman rite. That's really where I make the case most fully. And I didn't want to say one last thing. I'm sorry I'm going on here, but there's so many important points here. You asked earlier about, what do you say to somebody who says, well, shouldn't we just obey whatever the pope hands down? And one of the most basic principles of law of any law, including canon law, is that law has to be rational. It has to be reasonable. And there's the brilliant little treatise on this topic by Father Rivoir called, does traditiones custodes pass the legal rationality test? Okay, it's not a best selling title, I admit that, but it's a short book by a canon lawyer where he demonstrates that tradition as custodes violates rationality. It's not a reasonable set of laws, and he shows all the reasons why that's the case, and therefore, it's not a law at all. It has no force. Law has to be rational or reasonable in order to go into force and to have binding force on us. So that's another point here that we have to bear in mind when Pope Francis says, the novus ordo is the only form of the roman rite, the unique form of it. That's false. That's a falsehood. It isn't even the roman rite. That's what my book, the ones in future roman, demonstrates. There's the roman right, and then there's the modern right of Paul VI. And they're not the same right. They're two different rights, and that can be shown by all of the criteria that liturgists use to define rights. [00:43:52] Speaker A: So, yeah, I wanted one thing I want to say about, on the topic of, you know, finding underground mass, or whatever the case may be, I think the fact is, if the rumors become true, it's going to be a mess, as you said. And one thing I think is important is, personally, at least for me, I'm not going to attack people who attend the TLM now. I'm not going to attack them almost no matter what they end up doing, in a sense of if they decide they're going to continue going to their same parish that now celebrates the novus ordo, and maybe the priest does it way better than your typical novos, or because they've been influenced by the. By the traditional latin mass, or if they find a society chapel, or they go move, find a fraternity or institute, or if they go to an underground one that is not state of the contest, all those options. I'm not going to judge you for it. I mean, in the sense, like, I think there's no purpose in attacking somebody for saying, you know, either on one hand you're a semi tribe, or you're not even really trapped, because now you're going this novus ordo. I don't know your full situation. I don't know what options are available to you. I don't know. Maybe there's nine underground one available. Maybe you can't move. You're taking care of your elderly parents or whatever the case may be. [00:44:59] Speaker B: Exactly. [00:45:00] Speaker A: I'm also though, at the same time, though, the person who finds the underground mass and, you know, and goes to that, I'm not going to say anything against that either, because clearly that's not an immoral choice. I do want to say this last thing, though, is, and this is almost, I almost say it's tongue in cheek, but I don't actually, I do mean it. If you do end up in the situation that you're going to a quote unquote underground mass, please be prudent, don't be an idiot, and put in social media and like, you know, out the priest and, you know, or anything like that, because we live in an age where we want to tell everybody what we do all the time. And I remember back in the day when I was doing a lot of activist pro life work, we would do rescues where we, you know, get arrested, stuff like that. We always had to keep things very quiet beforehand because we didn't want it, you know, the police to find out about or anything like that. It's a similar attitude here. Don't, like, advertise when you do. Because I know, like, for example, during COVID there were people going, there were masses being said, and God bless the people who went and kept their mouths shut. I mean, that's the way it's got to be, word of mouth, people, because you don't want to get this diocesan priest in trouble, you know, for doing what the right thing, and he's taking a big risk. Don't, like, then go blabber about it on social media. [00:46:13] Speaker B: So, no, I agree 100%. I was in touch with. Oh, I'm in touch with a lot of people. But there was this older czech lady from the Czech Republic who wrote to me during the COVID period, and it was the most heartbreaking email, in a way. Well, it had a hopeful side, but also a heartbreaking side. She described to me how there was a priest who secretly was celebrating the latin mass in a particular chapel when officially the country's masses had all been shut down and no one was allowed to go. The bishop said, you all have to stay home. You're all dispensed, et cetera. We know what that was like. It happened everywhere, which, by the way, is so bizarre and so apocalyptic. But I'm not. We. That's another subject. And so. So this priest was doing it, and they had a system whereby any trustworthy person, like one trustworthy person, would be told, and that person could tell another trustworthy person. It had to be by word of mouth. No telephones were used, you know, and. And no email, no sort of trail in that sense. And then they would show up at the church and they'd have to sort of nonchalantly walk over to it one at a time, kind of look around, make sure nobody was watching, and then slip in through the side door. And they all had to sort of do that until they had gathered and then mass began. And what she wrote to me, this was the heartbreaking part. She said, this reminds me of my childhood under communism. This is the way it was like. This is what it was like, exactly like this. Right. Well, I'm afraid that that's what we might be looking at in this regard as well. I was just looking at, on Facebook at this post. It was photographs from a 1987 event in France at a place called. [00:47:53] Speaker A: Oh, I saw that. [00:47:54] Speaker B: Yeah. Where there was a priest celebrating the Trinity mass. Of course, he had been forbidden to do so, but they went into this church, which I don't think was being used for any other purpose, and they were having mass, and the diocese sicked the police on the priest and dragged him out by force. I mean, you can see the photographs of him in his vestments being dragged out by the police. The police drove out the men, women and children that were in the church and then barred it, barred the door and put up like a concrete wall or something. It was just crazy over the top. And you know what? A week later for Palm Sunday, the faithful came back. They busted through the door, they took over the church, and they never left. Right? I mean, that is the heroic spirit of catholic traditionalists. They never left. And you know what? Years later, the parish was entrusted to the Institute of Christ the king. Right? And so that story has a happy ending. The resiliency, the stubbornness, the holy stubbornness, the I will not budge attitude of those french traditionalists, and there were hundreds of them in Port Marley eventually reached a peaceful resolution, and all the paperwork was set right. And, you know, everything that was irregular was set right. And now they're a flourishing institute parish today. And I know of other examples like that. I know of another institute parish in New Jersey, actually, and then a fraternity parish in New Jersey, both of which started as independent chapels and then were later, if you want, if you will, reconciled by a bishop who actually just had a pastoral heart and said, I want these people in, you know, fully in communion with me or fully regularized, you know, I think they already were in communion with him, but I'm just using the terminology. Right? And so that's why I say to people, you know, don't worry so much about. Certainly don't worry so much about canonical niceties, because that is not the most important thing in this case. And don't worry about the future, either. Let God take care of the future. You just take care of yourself, your faith, your family, you know, and your bond with tradition. That's what you need to take care of, and God will take care of the rest. [00:49:58] Speaker A: Amen. Okay, we've gone for a while, but I have to, I still have. I hope you have time, because I want to ask you about a completely different subject, and that is, how does all this discussion about episcopal and papacy rolls? How does it apply to the case of Archbishop Vigano? And I bring this up because it's a controversial topic within traditional Catholicism, where you have good, holy, you know, or at least sincere good people who have a legitimate disagreement about this. And so I just wanted to hear what your thoughts on it are. [00:50:30] Speaker B: Sure. So just to start back further in the past, it seems to me that everybody should acknowledge Vigano as a hero for being a whistleblower. As Taylor Marshall tweeted the other day, let's all acknowledge that without Vigano, McCarrick would still be, you know, I mean, at this point, he's too feeble, but I mean, he would not have been punished, right? That's just a fact. He was the one, vegan was the one who blew the whistle on that and got things, got the ball rolling. And I think that the expose of not just McCarrick, but the connections, all kinds of connections there, I think was an important moment of illumination and also kind of a healthy disillusionment that all of us needed to sort of realize that actually, no, the abuse crisis has not been dealt with by the hierarchy of the church. In spite of all their hot air, it has not been dealt with. And I think that's still true. It's still. There's still a network. And the Ruknik case is just like the billboard version of that. Right? It's like, we don't care. We hate your guts Catholics. We think you're stupid and, you know, that's the way it is. So I think Vigano is very helpful, but I myself kind of, I soured on him after about 2020 when he started becoming more and more politically involved, more and more involved in Trump rallies. I mean, I voted for Trump twice, I'll vote for him again. But the way that he was getting politically involved and the sort of american political messianism which then morphed into russian and Putin messianism, something is off there. Something is very odd. And then the sort of apocalyptic ramblings which sometimes make sense and sometimes don't make sense and say very extreme things and sometimes a very rude way, I just find something has, to my mind, something has snapped with Vigano or with his ghost writer. I think there's a ghost writer that's writing most of this stuff. I think Roberto Dematte pretty convincingly proved that on stylometric grounds. If you look at his correspondenza Romana article from a few years back, even though Vigano denied that, I think, I mean, try to refute Demete's case, it's a watertight case. So I think that I do see Vigano as somebody that we shouldn't be following. We can admire his heroic stance on certain issues. We can say, yes, he's right to call out modernism. Yes, he's having. But the problem is there's just a vacuum of leadership. That's the reason why people rally to vignette. There's a vacuum of leadership. And there's also been a sort of enforced ban on discussing Vatican II in a serious way and re evaluating it and talking about its errors the way Bishop Snyder does. So I think that Vigano was sort of doing all the things that many other bishops ought to be doing and are not doing or not talking about. And as a result, people have put him on a pedestal, and that's why he's become such a hero. But if the other bishops and cardinals were doing their jobs, well, then I. Vigano would be sort of like, I don't know, he'd be yesterday's news, if you will. So that's why I think he's so popular. And I wish that traditional Catholics would recognize that if you are following him, you're following somebody who has a lot of strange, and I would say incoherent positions. And just because basically it's almost like, you know, I don't have a problem with conspiracy theory in general. I mean, a lot of conspiracies are true. History is full of conspiracies, but it's sort of almost like vigano picks every possible conspiracy theory and then connects them together, like, as if they're all just one thing and as if it's obvious. And I think it just leads to some very, very weird places. So, long story short, I don't think he should be excommunicated for the reasons that Bishop Schneider gave, which is it's just going to sow more chaos and division at a time when that's the last thing we need, it would, it would. I don't know. The problem is vigano is so stubborn. If Rome had summoned him to say, we'd like to have a conversation with you, we'd like to try to work out our difficulties, he would have spurned them. He would have said, I'm not coming. I'm not going to darken your door. So in a way, it seems like he's almost like the kid on the playground who's saying, I dare you to hit me. I dare you to hit me. Right, right. And I don't see why that's a, that's not a good stance to have towards any authority. I dare you to hit me. Well, they're, they're going to get peeved at a certain point and they're going to hit you. Right. I mean, is anybody really surprised about that, you know? [00:54:52] Speaker A: Yeah, I'm with you on that. I mean, basically, I'm in complete agreement on that. I just think it's, it is unfortunate. And I would, I would say that I agree with Bishop Schneider that I don't think he should be excommunicated. But at the same time, here's a case where I think that the Vatican, regardless what we think of the occupants right now there, like Cardinal Fernandez, who's very involved DDF with this, and of course, Pope Francis, we do recognize they do have authority. And so, like, they do have authority to tell a bishop who is literally saying, you don't have, you know, the pope doesn't have any authorities, not really the pope, to say, you're not really in communion with us anymore. And, like, whether or not they should or should not do that is beside the point. But, like, from a standpoint, but from a authority standpoint, I don't see how they don't have that authority to, to do that. [00:55:46] Speaker B: Yes, that's correct. I think that what makes this whole situation so aggravating is, to my mind, not that Vigano would be called on the carpet for saying outrageous things, but that so many other people are not being called on the carpet for saying outrageous things. I mean, what about the german bishops? They just keep getting slaps on the wrist and they keep going in their synodal way. You know, in, you know, they're just going to go off a cliff of modernism at some point and become another lutheran church and no serious disciplinary action has ever taken. And you can multiply the examples. I mentioned Father Rupnik, who shouldn't be Father Rupnik. I mentioned Father James Martin. I mean, I didn't mention him, but I could mention him, you know, and there are just, there are so many examples. I mean, Cardinal McElroy has actually spouted heresy. I mean, there's no question about it. But he's just fine. Right. So I think there's such a hypocrisy going on right now that that just makes it even more irksome to us when we see particular people getting nailed, you know. [00:56:49] Speaker A: Right. It doesn't make vigano right. But what it does is it shows how wrong the, and how, frankly, evil a lot of the actions of the Vatican is. I mean, that's what. [00:56:59] Speaker B: Well, it shows how, it shows that a kind of favoritism, like everybody hates prejudices and favoritisms that are not based in reality, that just seem like these are our petty grievances. We hate everybody who is in any way traditional, and we're just going to come after you. Almost like the stasi. We're just going to keep knocking on doors until we find all the jews and round them up and take them away. I just want to make another point along these lines, and that is, traditiones custodes is, I think, the biggest exercise in cynicism in the history of the church. And the reason I say that is it opens up with this grandiose language about how the bishops are the custodians of tradition, and they're in charge of the liturgy and their diocese is it belongs to them to decide who's going to use the 1962 Roman Missal. It says that explicitly. It's up to the bishop to decide. He's supposed to establish designated locations, et cetera, et cetera. And then what happens? Right, well, the bishops don't fall in line. So then the response audubia from December 18, 2021, comes down saying, actually, bishops. Just kidding. You're not really in charge. We're completely in charge. You can't do XYZ, PDQ, none of that stuff. You're basically peons. You're like pawns in this chess game. [00:58:19] Speaker A: I was. I think there's a chance, I think, when judicious custodians came out of, I think Francis and Fernandez and other, whoever, they actually thought all the bishops were behind them on this. And I think that's why later they're like, oh, crap, there's a bunch of bishops who actually don't back us. They're not like traditionalists. They're not like even. They don't even celebrate, but they're like, this is clearly just stupid. I'm not going to do this. And I think that's why they were kind of like, oh, well, that language we used was with the assumption, you guys all agree with us. Yeah, they don't agree with us. We're going to just change. You know, we're going to do it differently. [00:58:55] Speaker B: Yes, true. I think you might be right. But. But it seems like they never learn, because after the response of Adubia, I mean, of course some bad things happened, but most of the bishops still didn't clamp down as they were supposed to. And then the pope issued Desiderio Desideravi, kind of sullying, one of. One of the most beautiful expressions in the Gospel of Luke. But he issued that in June of last of 2022, again doubling down, that, as far as I can tell, had no effect. And he also said that the Nova Zora should be celebrated reverently, with no abuses and so on. I mean, good luck finding, finding real legislative teeth behind that. And then, of course, they came out with fiduciary supplicants, which met an even a much bigger resistance on the part of the hierarchy, including most of the continent of Africa, for goodness sakes. Right. They haven't learned their lesson. They don't. I think it's almost like this, right? The people in charge at the Vatican right now, either they don't care that they're not popular with a lot of people or, well, I don't know. They don't care. They want to do as much damage as they can while they can. Almost like a version of Samson in the Old Testament, who just pulls down the whole structure on top of himself, you know, like, I'm going to just take down as many people as I can. I mean, that's, that's what Roach Fernandez. These people, they want to do as much damage as they can. They want to homosexualize as much of the church as they can. They want to Novus orterize as much of the church as they can. And they know, they must know at some level that they will not be completely successful. But it's kind of like, I'll take down as many as I can until they shoot me principle, you know? And that's, it's sick. It's sick and it's tragic that we have to be governed by such men right now. Yeah. [01:00:41] Speaker A: The response of fiduciary supplicants was beautiful, frankly. And I'm hoping, my hope and prayer is that bishops around the world saw, wait a minute, we actually don't have to go along with this nonsense because we didn't go along with that. All the Africans didn't. And eventually what happened? The Vatican caved. Because you see the pope saying, oh, I never said that you could bless homosexual couples, which, of course he did, explicitly. And so it's like, because he realized there was such a big pushback, even he had to say, oh, I guess we have. And you saw Fernandez trying to beg the cops or something to go along, and they're just like, no, we're not. We're not on board with. And so my hope is, is that if he, if the rumored document does come out, but the TLM, the bishop. See that? See that? Remember the response Fiducia supplicants and be like, yeah, we're just not gonna. Which comes back to. Which probably is a good way to end this, because it's the point of your book, which is that you edited unresolved tensions in papal, episcopal relations, which basically talks on a very deep level about how bishop can react to papal commands and vice versa. [01:01:47] Speaker B: So. [01:01:49] Speaker A: Well, this has been great, Peter. I mean, this is, I know we could go for two more hours, but I'm going to cut it here. I think I covered the most important topics. So thanks for all you're doing. I know you're going to send me some links and I will put them in the show notes to various, obviously to the book, but also some of the things, other things that you referenced during our discussion. [01:02:07] Speaker B: Great. Wonderful. Thank you so much, Eric. [01:02:10] Speaker A: Yeah. Okay. Until next time, everybody. God love.

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April 01, 2022 01:07:43
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Sinful Obedience or Virtuous Disobedience? (Guest: Dr. Peter Kwasniewski)

Is there such a thing as sinful obedience? What about virtuous disobedience? On this Crisis Point, we’re going to talk about a proper understanding...

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Episode

February 13, 2024 00:36:25
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Are Women Deacons Coming to the Catholic Church?

There's been much talk recently at the highest levels of the Catholic Church about the possibility of women deacons, and one theologian close to...

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February 03, 2023 00:43:21
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Healthy Bodies, Healthy Souls (Guest: Dr. Kevin Vost)

Catholics rightly put their spiritual lives first. But what obligation do Catholics have to care for their bodies? And is there a connection between...

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