Resisting the Great Reset (Guest: Jason Jones)

May 24, 2024 00:53:24
Resisting the Great Reset (Guest: Jason Jones)
Crisis Point
Resisting the Great Reset (Guest: Jason Jones)

May 24 2024 | 00:53:24

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Hosted By

Eric Sammons

Show Notes

The Great Reset still sounds to some like a crazy conspiracy theory. Today we'll talk about what it is, why it's real, and most importantly, how to fight against it.
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Episode Transcript

[00:00:10] Speaker A: The great reset still sounds like to some, like a crazy conspiracy theory. Today we're going to talk about what it is, why it's real, and most importantly, how to fight against it. Hello, I'm Eric Samuels, your host, editor in chief of Crisis magazine. Where we get started. Just want to encourage people to hit that like, button. Subscribe to Channel, let other people know about it. Also, you can subscribe to our email newsletter. Just go to crisismagazine.com comma, put in your email address and we will send you an email once a day with our articles right to your inbox. Okay, let's get started. We got Jason Jones back, which we're very excited about. I feel like if I do your bio, it'd be easier to say what you haven't done. It'd take less time. But I want to give a few highlights so people know exactly a lot of the activities you've been up to. You're a film producer, author, activist, popular podcast host and human rights worker, president of the human rights education relief organization, known for its two main programs, the vulnerable people project and movie to moment. Sorry, movie to movement. Sorry, I just wanted, I'm going to put in here. I do not, my wife and I, we don't give to very many organizations, but we do give to vulnerable people project. I think it's a very noble cause. I think we talked about in our last podcast. I'll put a link to that so people can see it. But just, it does wonderful work. His humanitarian efforts have aided millions in Afghanistan, Nigeria and the Ukraine, as well as pregnancy centers and women's shelters throughout North America. He authors several books, including your latest, which is proudly published by crisis Publications. The great campaign against the Great Reset. Welcome to program, Jason. [00:01:47] Speaker B: Eric, it's a privilege to be back on your show. Thank you. Thank you for supporting VPP. That means the world. [00:01:52] Speaker A: Yeah, I mean, really, I encourage people to watch the other, the last podcast we talked about more detail there. We won't go into it here, but it really is just incredible work you're doing all around the world. And in fact, before we get started, like the great reset and all that, why don't you just tell us, like, what you've been up to lately besides writing the book. But, like, I know you're always active with stuff. I'm sure this bio is even like, dated by now, but like, what, what's the latest stuff that you're kind of working on right now? [00:02:16] Speaker B: Well, you know, since I think the last time we talked, I'm still in Afghanistan, where we're evacuating and resettling religious minorities and our former afghan allies who are not safe in Afghanistan, we've continued to do that with the civil war. In Sudan, we've been very involved in delivering food to try to ameliorate the suffering of the people of Sudan. A famine is barreling down. They're anticipating 8 million dead this year. And we've been evacuating women and children, primarily from the christian community, but not just from the christian community. From Gaza. We had just some beautiful news in the past week, past two weeks, a woman that we evacuated from Gaza, she was wounded, she was starving, she was pregnant with what she thought were twins, but she just gave birth to triplets. And the mom's healthy, the babies are healthy. And on top of that, I am writing my next book for Sophia Press. And I'll be in Spain. I'm headed to the Middle east soon. And then late June and early July, I'll be in Spain shooting my next movie, hills like white elephants by Ernest Hemingway. So we're keeping busy, you know, and it sounds like I do a lot, but I really do one thing two ways. My job is to defend the vulnerable from violence. That's why I founded hero over 20 years ago. And we do that two ways, by inspiring solidarity and by promoting human dignity. So you can look at the podcast, the articles, the books, the activism, really, we're trying to defend the vulnerable from violence by promoting human dignity and inspiring solidarity. Whether it's the child in the womb or the christian families and the holy family perish in Gaza or, you know, the Jews in Africa, we provide security for synagogues and catholic churches and other ecclesial communities facing islamist extremism across Africa. But at the end of the day, it's really just one thing that we're doing, and we're seeking to defend the vulnerable from violence. And I see behind you our Lord on the cross, and we look to the Pieta and our lady as sort of the symbol of what our apostolate is. And we want to be with our Lord when he's in the cross. And I think the way that we do that in a way that we can evangelize most efficiently is serving the most vulnerable people in the world quietly and humbly with fortitude and diligence. And that's what we seek to do at hero and through VPP and moving to movement. [00:04:32] Speaker A: Yeah, you know, I mean, just the story I saw this, I think. I'm not sure if it was on Facebook or Twitter somewhere where I saw the story of the pregnant mother in Gaza, and I just. It's amazing because we see what's happening there and we think to ourselves, this humanitarian crisis. And I think most of us sit in our comfortable houses in America and think, oh, this is awful. But we. That's kind of where we end. We just stop there. And yet you're doing something. And by supporting you, I think people then can know that, okay, you're actually helping real people. That's actually why I don't. I'm not a fan of a lot of these major charitable organizations because I feel like what I'm giving money to then is their bureaucracy and potentially their woke ideology at times. But it's like you have examples of real people. And, I mean, I almost want to ask, like, I'm not even sure if I can ask this, but, like, how do you get somebody out of Gaza? I mean, right now? I mean, that seems like an impossible task. [00:05:24] Speaker B: You know, I was interviewed by a reporter just last week, and she asked me the same question. She was like, it's because you're a veteran. It's your military experience. And they always want to think that. And I'm like, no, the truth is, like, the reporter did not expect this. I said, you know, we're a christian organization. The body of Christ is everywhere. And we work with the communities we serve. To serve those communities. I can knit together teams. We're very good at logistics and team building. And we have teams. The most remote parts of Afghanistan, inside Gaza, across Africa. We can knit together teams. It's really the body of Christ. And the other thing I told this reporter, which I don't think she expected, is it's my long. You know, even when I was a young soldier, I was very active in the pro life movement. In the pro life movement. And I started in the late eighties. You know, we had to work without anyone saying, attaboy, you're a hero. No, they'd spit in your face. You would have to. You know, when I was founded, the pro life student unit at the University of Hawaii, it wasn't like the faculty and administration celebrated me for my human rights work, which is what that was. [00:06:24] Speaker A: Right. [00:06:25] Speaker B: And you're able to walk in the darkness towards an objective with no reasonable, reasonable hope of success. But we know we will succeed. And so I think what the VPP is made up of Catholics who came up in the pro life movement, we seek to do an authentic, consistent ethic. Not what we've often been told is a consistent ethic, which is where you drowned the child in the womb in an ocean filled with prudential issues. But where we recognize that there are like and commensurate issues to abortion, for example, democide and genocide. And we seek to defend the most vulnerable people in the world when others won't stand with them. And we don't need to talk about this today, but it comes from when I was a young man and I was not in a position to defend my vulnerable child. And so that's, as a young soldier, that's what inspired me to want to spend the rest of my life and standing with fathers. And that's really how I see my apostolate. I'm standing with fathers who are in impossible situations alone to defend their families from violence, and we want to stand with them to defend their families. [00:07:37] Speaker A: That's great. Now people might think, like, what the heck? Does this have anything to do with the great reset? Like you said, everything that you do is kind of all together. You write this book about the great reset. What's that have to do with defending the vulnerable? So I guess the first question I have to ask is, I mean, related to that, but, like, what is the great reset? And why do you see it as something that we should resist? Because obviously, the people who promote the great reset promote as helping the vulnerable and helping people. [00:08:02] Speaker B: That's softball pitch. Eric Sammons, you read softball? Well, first of all, I asked myself that same question, by the way. What the heck? Because I'm very. Sometimes people say, you're doing so much. Why aren't you more focused? I'm very focused. And so when the COVID lockdowns were about to descend on the world during the italian lockdown, when Italy was locked down, I started speaking out, saying that if the world follows the China model that Italy now is following, this was very early on. We're going to create a famine. Because when you slow down food production, processing, and distribution, the most vulnerable people in the world are going to starve. That was my number one fear. I didn't know about the hek vaccine yet. Human embryonic hek vaccine. I didn't know about any of this, but. But my number one concern was food security for the poorest people on earth. So then in my home state of Hawaii, I was going to lead a protest against the lockdown. And I ended up being the first person in the United States arrested leading an anti COVID lockdown. And at this moment, I was like, am I distracting? You know, I'm obviously putting myself in a position of vulnerability. I was being attacked in the media. I was not only in the front cover of my local newspaper, above the fold, I was in newspapers across the country, and I was actually on drugs, reported handcuffs. So I was asking myself, you know, is this mission creep? And it was not. You know, it was not. And I understood that, but I was questioning that. And the other thing was, why did I write this book? I'm going to be very honest, and I'm glad I can say it on the Crisis podcast. I was supposed to write another book for you, and that was on Rocky soil, a spiritual autobiography from a man you may not meet in heaven. And that's my next book. But I was really in a very dark place. I became despondent in the wake of the fall of Afghanistan. It's really hard to even talk about because we lost a lot of people that we were trying to evacuate families, you know, women and children and people like, you know, in the media, we tell our successes, you know, we don't go to the press and say we lost an interpreter in his family, that we moved to Abbeygate during the Abbeygate explosion. We don't tell that to people. [00:10:25] Speaker A: Right, right. [00:10:26] Speaker B: And so I was despondent. I was dealing with acedia, to use theological terms, and I was in no place to write about my relationship with God. I had signed the contract with you guys, and I want people to know this because this is a very decent and humane thing that you guys did for me. I was. And, you know, I'd say, can I have another year to write this book? Because I. I'll come out of this funk. You know, it was a very dark place. And I wanna say I never lost my faith in God. It was. I thank God for this grace. I believed in God in the midst of my deep sorrow and confusion. And the only way I can put it is like God and I were in the same car. I was like, yeah, okay, we're going to the Grand Canyon together on vacation. Okay, we're driving across the country, but how about. Let's not talk. Let's just listen to music. Okay. I just. I wouldn't sit here. And so, you know, I had asked. It was in June. It was. It was in June of last year that I had this. This book in me. I was very angry at the great reset, and I saw a lot of wonderful books on the great reset that looked at the economics, looked at it through politics, but to me, it was really about anthropology. And so I. You know, I just called and asked. I said, I'm not going to make the deadline on this, this book, which, as a writer, memoirs are the easiest things to write. You know, obviously, it's. You're. You're writing about yourself, your thoughts, your feelings, my relationship with God, my stories. But I couldn't. I just couldn't write it. And so I'd asked. I was in. I was in. I was in Ukraine, and I got a call from you guys, like, hey, what's the. How's it looking? And I'm like, it's not looking like nothing. Like a blank page. I said, you know, but I want to write this book, the great campaign against the great reset, that looks at it through the anthropological lens, through a gerardian lens, really. And I can't believe I got Gil Bailey to write the epilogue. To me, that's the most. The best part about the book is Gil Bailey wrote the epilogue. And I wanted to write this book because I was in Ukraine. I had gone through cities that were just devastated. And I could see the brutality, the crass brutality and thoughtlessness to human suffering of our quote unquote global elite. I had lunch yesterday with former governor of Kansas, former senator from Kansas, and former ambassador at large, religious liberty, Sam Brownback. And we were talking about the failure of the quote unquote elite, the thoughtlessness to human suffering of our elite. That's, to me, what the great reset is. What we worry about coming for us has already come for populations around the world, and it's been devastating and brutal. And so that's where my mission is just very simple, to defend the vulnerable from violence that are in seemingly impossible situations. But through solidarity, those impossible situations become possible. There is a new who agreement that right now, as we speak, countries around the world are debating that will cede our sovereignty over not only the sovereignty of the United States, but every country in the world will be seeding their sovereignty over to the who that can lock down any country in the world whenever they want, or every country. Or they can just say, we're going to lock down Texas because of a climate emergency, and or we're going to lock them down because of an abortion emergency. That's really in the agreement. If a country doesn't provide women access to abortion, they can lock it down. The who can lock it down. They pull that out from the initial framework, but they told you what they hoped to do. And so I realized that what we call the great reset, it's at the heart of the work of the vulnerable people project, and it is not a conspiracy theory. They say out loud, you are going to own nothing. And be happy you are going to eat cricket meat. I mean, it sounds crazy to say, but so does partial birth abortion and born alive abortions and euthanizing people like they do in Canada because they're depressed. It just sounds like you're a crazy person to say it, but this is the reality. And the reality is that COVID policy. Well, we were all suffering with zoom fatigue. And I don't know about you, Eric, but when you watched everything you wanted to watch on Amazon and Netflix and Hulu, and you're like, oh, no, the horror of the lockdowns. Well, we produced the great. It was the greatest famine since World War Two, and it received no coverage. I was walking through the airport in the. In the middle of the COVID shutdowns, and I looked. I walked past the newsstand and the Atlantic and the New Yorker and Harper. All of these magazines had zoom fatigue. Zoom fatigue? Zoom fatigue articles on the COVID We were worried about Zoom fatigue. And trust me, I didn't like the Zoom meetings anymore. I learned how to shower while on Zoom calls. Weights on Zoom calls, like, I did my. You know, just shut the camera off. Hope the camera's off. Don't want to be a scandal. And, yeah, we were all tired of it. But the reality is, COVID policy led to devastated. A generation's ability to learn and socialize led to a massive spike in suicides. Starve the world. And now with the new who agreement, it's barreling it. So this is an anthropological look. And by the way, the great reset is all about anthropology. Maybe we can talk about that. [00:15:59] Speaker A: Yeah, that's exactly what I want to ask was kind of like the foundational principles of the great reset. Like, what are they? And why is it basically an attack on who we are as men and women? [00:16:11] Speaker B: Well, the keystone is victimism, and victimism is a term. My wife said, what's your goal with this book? I said, my goal is that the word victimism ends up in the dictionary. And more people read Renee Girard and Gil Bailey. And if that's what I achieve, I'm very happy. What is victimism? Victimism is feigning concern for the vulnerable to achieve wealth, power, and prestige. That's what victimism is. And the opposite of victimism. I have the five principles of the great reset, these five ideological enthusiasms, and the five humane principles that descend from christian revelation and natural law. So the opposite of victimism would be solidarity. Solidarity is when you stand in solidarity with the vulnerable till you become indistinguishable from those you stand with. And again, that's why the Pieta, to me is so important. You know, our Lord became a curse so that we could become eternal life. He died so we could have life. Our lady is holding her son, her lifeless body, across. That's. That's solidarity. You can think of St. Damian, who traveled across two oceans to serve the lepers in Hawaii and died of leprosy. Or St. Damian, who is a young priest, consecrated his priesthood at San Andrea Delafrate at the altar of the miracle. He dedicated his priesthood to the conversion of the Jews and the Freemasons, and he dies in the starvation bunker in Auschwitz. This is what authentic solidarity looks like. But if you're getting credentialed and you're getting accolades and you're becoming incredibly wealthy, think black lives matter. That's victimism. That's what victimism is. So that's the key. So once we understand that, like you said early on, they talk about open borders as if you support order at the border instead of the chaos that we have now, you somehow are a hateful person. But the reality is, if you are authentically concerned for the vulnerable, every 11 seconds, a young american dies from fentanyl. We have an economy that rests on the exploitation of over 11 million migrants in a dangerous underground economy. If you have new immigrants and the poorest Americans seeing their wages undercut by the exploitation of labor of migrants that are here illegally, the exploitation of their labor drives down legal immigrants wages. If you really care about these vulnerable people, well, you'll advocate a secure border, but yet you'll be called a bigot. Well, that's okay, because that comes with the territory, right? You can think of the electric vehicle, which I beat up in the book, and I beat up often over there at the stream. The electric vehicle is not only the greatest environmental catastrophe on the road, its wheels are 30% bigger. Most of the pollution that comes from vehicles today on the road, it's from the tires of electric vehicles. But that's not even the beginning of it. The real problem with electric vehicles is your EV, which I call a BV. You have blood diamonds. You have blood vehicles. The electric vehicle is birthed in the cobalt mines of Congo, where you have christian children as young as six digging for hand by hand for cobalt, working for CCP owned companies. So CCP owned companies exploiting child labor and toxic cobalt mines. So you can drive your ev. Let's not talk about what lithium does in Central and South America. So you can drive your ev with your coexist bumper sticker feeling like a great person, which you really are, is a victimist. And so that's the core principle. But you also have. So when I say it's anthropological, the other two core principles are transhumanism and anti humanism. Well, transhumanism and anti humanism are drawing and quartering the truth about the true understanding of the human person, which was made fully known through the incarnation of the second person of the Trinity, is a man. It was first revealed through jewish scriptures. You know, even through reason, we get a glimpse of it. I was an Ayn Rand objectivist atheist until my late twenties, which is very embarrassing. But Ayn Rand said something that captivated me as a 7th grader. I read something that she wrote when I was in 7th grade, and she said that the exalted dignity of the human person is axiomatic. It's self evident, and it is like you look at your neighbor as he's dragging you, dragging the garbage can out to the curb, and you can look at that guy in his robe, belly hanging out, and that guy is the most beautiful, creative thing in the cosmos. I can get on a rocket and go in any direction for all of eternity, and I will never bump into a creature as beautiful as a human person. Cs Lewis says, God must have given us a veil, because if we saw each other as we truly were, we couldn't walk down the street without dropping to our knees and looking up and staring at every person we seek. This is a truth that you don't need revelation to acknowledge, as Ayn Rand said, as self evident, as axiomatic, as our founding fathers said in the declaration principle. Declaration of independence, that what we call the declaration principle, we hold these truths to be self evident. All men are created equal, but that's not an explanation. But theologians and philosophers and priests and laymen for centuries meditating on the gospel of Jesus Christ gave us this understanding that, well, what is the source of this axiomatic dignity? Self evident? Well, we were made in the image and likeness of God. And the great reset seeks to wipe that away, on the one hand, by promising you that they're going to make you more than human, uploading your brain into the cloud. And on the other hand, you have the anti humanism that seeks to brazenly reduce population, abortion, assisted suicide, euthanasia. Then you have gnosticism. What does Gnosticism have to do with the great reset? You think of the fact checkers on Facebook. This is gnosticism. You have these, like, mysterious elite that don't have to explain themselves saying, this is fake, this is true. They're obliterating our ability to communicate. The reason why the church is already, has always condemned gnosticism. It doesn't have to be demonic. It doesn't have to come from a Ouija board. No. When you have anonymous, ambiguous, think of QAnon, anonymous ambiguous statements that can't be refuted or supported. What this does in a community, it creates violence, breakdown. Because we cannot communicate. We cannot know, we can no longer trust each other, communicate honestly. So gnosticism is another, is another key ideological enthusiasm of the great reset. And then finally the climate cult, which is controlling, it's really controlling energy production and distribution. And we're keeping energy away from the poorest people in the world. Something that's funny is funny. Not haha, but strange. You know, you would think like, with the work of VPP, something I would do would make the normal, victimist human rights people go, good for you. Jason Jones. That's beautiful. One of the things might be our coal for Christmas campaign. This is a fact. Eric Sammons I have distributed more coal for Christmas than St. Nicholas or Santa Claus ever has. Because I've distributed like thousands of tons of coal to good boys and girls across Afghanistan for the children, widows and orphans, and religious minorities who suffer death by exposure. We distribute coal every year, over 100 million hour in heat in the past three years. I get criticized for this, that I'm contributing to global warming, because we're giving coal to keep families alive. Like, I can promise you, Eric, my carbon footprint, your carbon footprint in one year is more than the average Afghans, quote unquote. Who cares? I don't care how much plant food you put in the world, but that's good for you. But the reality is you and I put more plant food in the air every year than an afghan family will do in its entire life. The fact that I'm distributing coal, I get criticized. And people actually say, you should provide them solar energy. Okay, sure, yeah. Solar energy, that's made with petroleum products, by the way. [00:24:34] Speaker A: Yeah. I mean, so much that. So much there. Now the great. Now it's still like, great reset sounds very shadowy. And like, specifically though, like, I feel like there's multiple layers of the great reset. There's the useful idiots, the people who actually do think they're helping the world. And so they're like all on board with a lot of stuff that happens. You see that with like the midwits on Twitter who are like supporting it and like, a lot of media outlets, but like on the top level, you know, we know some names like a Klaus Schwab or a Bill Gates or something like that. Like, how is this, like, coordinated? Is it just a bunch of really, you know, rich, you know, men and women who are just basically on the same page? Or is it more of a coordinated effort? And, you know, so who is it actually that we're talking about that we're against here? [00:25:22] Speaker B: Well, it's very coordinated. I don't know if Klaus Schwab is seeking to resign from the World Economic Forum. [00:25:26] Speaker A: I saw that. Yeah. [00:25:28] Speaker B: Strangely, he has to ask the permission of the swiss government to resign. That was very strange to me. You wonder, like, where is this all going? Where is this coming from? I'll tell you. By the way, I want to address, I got a criticism. Somebody emailed me was very strange. A supporter emailed me and said, I don't like your book at all. I hadn't had a negative review yet, so I was like, okay. And, you know, he wanted a lot of, like, the cloak and dagger conspiracy theory. And what I wanted to do was cut the great. The advocates of the great reset off at the past, which is defending the christian understanding of the human person and the humane institutions that emanate from it and expose the ideologies they use to hack at the roots. But what he wanted was more of the, like, the mechanisms of the operations of the control. And I think that's what you're getting to. I want to share. It's highly interconnected. My first glimpse of this was in the late nineties. I was a college student. I was in my apartment, and it was, you know, maybe I think it was 95. I don't remember exactly what year, but we were barreling down on the end of the century, the end of the millennia. And there was a Charlie Rose special. And I don't remember all who was on the panel, but Bill Gates was on the panel, and Charlie Rose and Warren Buffett was on the panel. Now, at this time, I was an Ayn Rand atheist objectivist, and I would not have been opposed to transhumanism necessarily. So Bill Gates, Charlie Rose, asked them, what's the biggest change that you see coming in the next thousand years, next 100 years? And Bill Gates said, the magic year, 2030 came up. The biggest change in the next thousand years will happen by 2030, and that's human beings will become immortal. We are going to develop the ability to make the computer and your head, the meat computer in the head and this computer compatible, and you will go to a doctor, every six months and upload your consciousness into the computer. And then when you die, we can download your consciousness into, let's say you get hit by a car into a clone of yourself, okay? And you'll only lose a couple months from your last upload to then. He said, eventually you'll be uploading into a cloud, or you can wear wearable devices. He said, first there'll be wearable devices, but eventually you'll just upload it, and in real time, you get hit by the car, you'll lose, no, none of your memory. And now this is where it gets heavy. This is where it gets into the anti humanism. And this is where I say transhumanism and anti humanism are a war on our posterity. We are waging war on our posterity. We are vultures that are praying on our own posterity before they are born, because we see them as competitors for resources. This is what Bill Gates said. Human beings will no longer need to reproduce to continue as a species. They will continue as a species. Not the reproduction, but the radical extension of our lives. Peter Thiel famously said, an interesting man, pro life, gerardian, transhumanist, Christian in a same sex marriage. Interesting fellow, right? But he said that the first person to live to be a thousand has already been born, so we don't need to reproduce. Bill Gates says, then Warren Buffett said, and this is how Bill got me to understand the importance of population control. [00:29:25] Speaker A: Wow. [00:29:26] Speaker B: So you look at the obsession with population control that you see coming from the elite. They're the same people the elite used to spend their wealth on. Libraries, right? Parks, education. Now they're spending billions of dollars investing in transhumanist technology. And I outline some examples in my book of one gentleman who takes blood plasma from his son regularly. They go, and him and his son sit next to each other, and the plasma from his son goes into his body. It cost him a million dollars a year. He said he eventually stopped it, not because it was immoral or he felt bad about it, but because it just wasn't working. He felt he's a vampire. But who is this vampire feeding off of his own son? Well, in a way, when Bill Gates and Warren Buffett were sitting there on pbs in the nineties, what they were saying is that we must destroy our posterity. Not, we need to be not thoughtful of them. We need to make sure they never come about. Why? Because we'll be there. So ever after seeing that, whenever I hear Bill Gates and Warren Buffett use victimism in the language of concern for future generations. I know who they're talking about. Themselves. [00:30:49] Speaker A: Right. I mean, it does make sense, the population control push, because you're taking away, in their mind, they're taking these. These kids are taking away future resources from them because they're not. They're never going to die. I mean, they think, I mean, they're in for a big shock soon, but, yeah, it's amazing that they can do that now. I mean, I feel like, and I think a lot of us agree that Covid, in a lot of ways, the response to Covid was a trial run for how do we make some of these things happen? How do we control the populace in such a way? I mean, there's, you know, some people would even say that Covid itself, you know, was part. I'm gonna get totally kicked off of YouTube. But, like, the idea being that it was partially part of the population control aspects, but also the government control and things of that nature. And so how does that all tie into kind of the great reset and their practical ways? They're trying to make what they want happen to happen. [00:31:53] Speaker B: Yeah. We have to come up with words, right? [00:31:55] Speaker A: Yeah, right. [00:31:58] Speaker B: About abortion. That the comedy that came out in the. And they call it smash mortion. I don't want to smash. Morrison. We want to call. Yeah. What? Schmoyo. Schmepping. [00:32:10] Speaker A: Yeah, right. Exactly. [00:32:14] Speaker B: Yeah. Look, here's what you need to know right now. The who is saying that worked so well. The only thing that didn't work well is we didn't have enough control. Like, we need to be able to shut down the entire world. God forbid. Like, my family fled our home in Hawaii for Texas to escape COVID policy. That was the only flaw in the lockdown that who sees. So the who. These are distant, unelected bureaucracies from countries. Beautiful countries. Like, doctor Tedros is from a beautiful country, Ethiopia. But, you know, there's that, like, food to government paradigm. Like, the better the food, the worse the government. Okay, my favorite food is ethiopian. The last. Okay, but my least favorite politicians are from Ethiopia. Why would we want to give an ethiopian control over locking down Brown county in Texas or Cook county in Chicago or Maui county in Hawaii? Why would we do. That's insane. I will give Doctor Tedros. He can come over. He can come to my house and cook me dinner. I'll let him do that. Make me some ethiopian. I'll be happy with that. But I don't want him to control my county. I was handcuffed by my former students. That I taught christology and ethics to 20 years earlier. Handcuffed me because I was leading a peaceful protest with family singing, women, dancing, hula children riding their bikes, and I was handcuffed. Of course, I was never charged. I was thrown in the back of a car. I left in a police car in a basement with the windows up for 3 hours before they processed me. Okay. Why? Because Honolulu was obeying the who's policies, which came from China. So at the end of the day, the who was a sock puppet for the CCP and the city and county of Honolulu, an HPD, became a sock puppet for the who, and I was handcuffed. A woman who was handcuffed with me and the other man who was handcuffed with me. They both had heatstroke. [00:34:35] Speaker A: Wow. [00:34:35] Speaker B: Okay. And were hospitalized, and they were so frustrated that I was fine back there. I was just there, and I was praying. I just said, God, who's been in the back of here? I thought of the lawyer that got the DUI, the young woman, you know, I just thought of every kind of criminal that sat back here. I was trying to visualize them and pray for them. And when they came to get me out of the back of the police car, I was kind of upset because I was on such a roll, praying. I was like, no, no, no. I got more. No, no, no. I got more praying to do. You can leave me back here. Are you sure? You look like you're melting. I'm good, bro, but this is what we're looking at. But in Kenya, for example, agriculture workers only worked half days. Why? Because they were looking at a year in prison and a $5,000 fine if they didn't make it home before curfew. In India, the poorest of the poor, the Dalits, the untouchables, and others that were migrant workers suffered incredible abuse at the hands of the government if they violated COVID policy trying to feed their family and work. So the reality is, they looked at what they did, and they said, wow, that was pretty good, guys. We want to do that. Let's do that again and again and again. We just can't let any. We can't let Sweden slip out this time. We don't want any. We don't want Texas and Florida to slip out this time. [00:35:50] Speaker A: Right? [00:35:51] Speaker B: So, yeah, it's very serious stuff. And so what does it have to do with my apostolate, the vulnerable people project? It's. At the end of the day, the great reset is the greatest threat to human dignity ever. In fact, this who treaty right now that we're looking at is the most severe threat to our sovereignty since the war of 1812. And that may sound like hyperbole, but it is not hyperbole. This is real. This is real. [00:36:23] Speaker A: So one of the things I like about your book, the great campaign against the great reset, is that it might seem like somebody might see this and think, oh, it's one of these books where you're just raging. An old man on his porch, raging at the kids getting off as long, you know, getting mad at these people. But it's a very hopeful book. That's, that's what's, that's what's great about it. And so my question to you now is kind of, let's move on to, okay, these forces, these evil and very powerful, let's be honest, very, very powerful forces are aligned in this threat to human dignity. What can I just, you know, speaking to anybody in the audience here who just maybe just a regular person, what can I do about that? Is there any hope for me that the world's not going to be taken over by these evil men and what can I do to actually resist it? [00:37:13] Speaker B: Yeah. Well, I look at everything through hopeful lens. Not an optimist, but I have hope. A lot of the afghan allies that we've rescued, they'll say to me, I remember your first words to me where? On the phone when we talk to them on signal or however we're talking to them, I'll always say my first words to them, you're going to be okay. We're going to be with you to your safe. Let's find the way out of this problem. We're going to find the way out of this problem for you. And so, of course, when I look at the problem of the great reset, I mean, to leave my posterity a culture of life and a civilization of love. You know, I used to, Eric. I'm always. When I was 17, I dropped out of high school and joined the army on my 17th birthday. And I remember being 17 in laying in my bunk at Fort Benning, Georgia, staring at the ceiling and thinking, I am the luckiest guy in the world. I am 17 and I'm in the infantry. I'm already in the army, double my age and I'm 34 and I'll still be young. I remember being 34 and saying, I'm 34. You know, I've done this and this. I want to do so much more. Double my age. I'm 68. I'm still working now. I'm 52. I'm like I'm 52, double my age. And there's a tombstone that someone hasn't cut the grass around for ten years, you know, and so. But how I really see it is I'm. Where am I going to be in 52 years? Well, I hope with our lord. But here, where can I be? I really want to have planted a lot of olive trees that my grandchildren will be sitting under and eating from. And so when we think to battle back against the great reset, we are going to win. But one thing we should recognize is we may not end up in the shire. And in fact, I quote Frodo in the beginning of the book, that will save the shire, but not for us. And I'm completely comfortable with that. I am completely comfortable dying on my way to Mordor, hopefully on my way back, you know, so I'm completely comfortable. So what is the way out? Well, the proper name for this book, we wouldn't have sold as many copies, and it's selling very well, would have been the mystical body of Christ versus the mystical body of the Antichrist, because this is what this is really about, and what the great reset is really about is wiping away the christian understanding of the human person. That's why you'll find HeideggEr so often, Nietzsche and Heidegger, so many of these philosophies that are at the root of these enthusiasms, because it's not enough for them to even wipe away Christ. They want to wipe away logos. They want to wipe away any sort of comprehensive, a metaphysical, proper understanding of truth. They want to wipe away not only anthropology, but epistemology. So, you know, at the root, you find so many times Heidegger. So how do we battle back? And this one guy who didn't like my book, you know, he didn't understand. I don't know what he thinks. Like, there's what strategy or tactics that we can use to expose the who know how we win. It's very simple. That's why I use the great campaign. It comes from. From two people used it, St. John Paul the Great, who called us to launch a great campaign against the culture of death, marshaling resources like we did against totalitarianism and fascism, socialism and fascism. And Cs Lewis wrote that we need to launch when Christ landed, arrived. It's like the rightful king landed. And we're launching a great campaign of sabotage of this world. So we want to sabotage what the great, the globalists have in store. We want a great campaign to promoting the gospel of life. So how do we win? It's just very simple. The first thing is we live lives and we advocate. And this is the Catholics battle, communicating the truth and dignity about the human person, which is wonderful. My son and I'm traveling. My son's right over there right now. Last night we came back, we had a great day. I did EWTN news nightly. I met with Senator Brownback, and then I met with some other folks. My son and I came back, and there was a homeless guy, and he's arguing with the 711 guy. He wanted something. He didn't have enough money. I'm like, what do you want, bro? I'll get it for you. He wanted cigarettes. I'm not getting you cigarettes, man. And he said, I'll. Come on, you know. I said, no. He's like, why don't you want to give me cigarettes? I'm like, because I love you, and I don't. I don't want you to get cancer. He's like, I really want those cigarettes. I said, I'm going to get you cigarettes. And I. And I pointed at the cashier. I said, but when you get lung cancer, blame the cashier, not me. Okay, we're gonna get you these cigarettes. The first pack of cigarettes I've ever purchased in my life. I've never smoked cigarettes. So I bought the guy the cigarettes, and he goes, you love me, don't you? You really do. I said, of course I love you. I love you. I love him. Why? I go, you know you're made in the image and likeness of God, right? You know that about yourself, right? The guy glowed, didn't he, son? He's nodding, yeah. Smiled. And he said to my son, you got the coolest dad, man. And he just smiled because he knew it, by the way. But he didn't know it. He didn't know if I knew it. I think this guy, he knew that he was made the image and likeness of God. He understood that. But he was surprised I understood that about him because he wasn't looking good. He wasn't in good shape. This is our job. This is the foundation of our apostle today as catholic laypeople. And I think the heresy of the age, I think it's a christian heresy. Victimism is a christian heresy, and it's dominating the world. So as Catholics, the foundation of our campaign against the great reset is to unapologetically advocate for the truth of the human person. And that's the first whole life principle, the core principle of the everything good and noble in our society that we seek to conserve emanates from the christian understanding of the human person. So the first principle that I have in the book is christian personalism. And that's the core, that's the key, as victimism is the key to understanding the ideological enthusiasm is a great reset, the proper understanding of the human person. If we had a society where everybody understood that they were made the image and likeness of God and their neighbors had inviable dignity, beauty and worth, the great reset would just crash and turn to dust. So that's the foundation of it all. [00:43:53] Speaker A: Now, we're going to wrap it up here in a minute, but I want to kind of ask, what are some signs of hope that you've seen, like practical things you've actually seen that makes you have hope for the future. And like you said, not optimism, because optimism is just a human thing, that we're just like, oh, you know, we think under our own power we can do something. Well, what are some signs of hope that you've seen in all your travels and talking to people that there is that we don't have to feel like the great reset is inevitable, that it's just going to happen no matter what. [00:44:20] Speaker B: Well, look at the farmers in northwestern Europe, the truckers in Canada, you know, the deplorables all across the United States that we're not having it. But something else that gives me a lot of hope is I think we can all agree that the church has not been speaking clearly and consistently grounded in our tradition, in our magisterium. But yet somehow I've never seen more people coming to the faith. You know what? We used to talk about the springtime of faith 20 years ago. That wasn't the springtime of faith. That was the indian summer of faith. [00:44:58] Speaker A: Right? [00:44:59] Speaker B: That was the end. That was indian summer. Does that make sense? [00:45:03] Speaker A: Yes, it's very clear because, like, I remember the nineties very well. [00:45:07] Speaker B: Yeah. [00:45:08] Speaker A: And there was this, like, optimism, and it was, it's very different now. Like, the people converting now is very different because I converted back in the nineties. But there's a whole different vibe to it that I feel the same way, that it's just something different about it, that I feel like it's a little bit deeper because sadly, a lot of the converts from the nineties did eventually leave the faith again. And that's tragic because I think a lot of it was based upon some human considerations, like the charisma and power of JP. Two things like that. [00:45:37] Speaker B: Conferences were great. You'd get your bundled plastic, bundled twelve cd sets, and you go home, you had your Scott Hahn books and then there was the series of truth speaks. The different converts would tell their story. [00:45:52] Speaker A: Yeah. Surprised by truth. Yeah, right. [00:45:54] Speaker B: Was surprised by truth. One and two and three. I was like, one day I'll be in that book. I've never, I was never in that book. But you know, and it was so exciting. I think we are living now in the very first days of the springtime of faith. And when I look at people like Russell Brand, by the way, he's, you know, he's still poorly formed. Yeah, but he's amazing. And I look at all these people coming to the church and it's like, it's like a move of the Holy Spirit. Clearly it's not. [00:46:22] Speaker A: I love all these people. I mean, I love all these people like Russell Brand. I mean, yeah, we know he's not fully formed. You know, Candace Owens recently that. I can't remember her name, but that porn star who's converted and all these people that like. Yeah, I mean, first of all, as a convert, I know I knew very little about the catholic faith the day after I was brought into the church. I mean, it's not like you learn it all beforehand and now you're an expert. Give these people time. Especially somebody like Russell Brandt. Yeah, he needs like time to like see what's going on. But you see a real longing. And it's a funny thing because in the nineties it seemed like people were converting, not denigrating people. Convert. Ninety's, I'm one of them. But like it was more of a, like looking at the positives of, of the church on the surface or Catholicism. But now it's more like they're seeing those positives through a lot of the evil, which I think there's something deeper to that. There's evil around them and somehow God is piercing through that evil to show them there is another way. There's another way than a life as a porn star or as a celebrity and you know, living that type of lifestyle. So it really is pretty beautiful. [00:47:30] Speaker B: Yeah, no, and they know, and they know that the social cost, there was no cost then. It was, you know, it was, it was no cost. And yet they're still coming to the church. So. And young people, this Gen Z, Gen Alpha, I don't even know. I think generations don't make sense anymore. They used to be like big and now it's like, properly speaking, I think because technology is changing so fast that there are big gaps between people who are maybe only ten years apart. [00:47:55] Speaker A: Yeah, I see it. I have kids that are very 18 years apart from the oldest youngest. And, like, I have a break in between. But, like, the older kids versus the younger kids, they do seem like different generations in a lot of ways. [00:48:08] Speaker B: Well, you know, there's something that's very wise. Gen Z and Gen Alpha. There was a great quote on my next movie that the Ernest Hemingway film I'm making. Hemingway hated how people called his generation the Lost Generation, and they were right. I mean, they suffered World War one, which was very brutal. If you want to understand the jazz age, you have to understand that these women that you saw, these flappers smiling had shattered hearts because they were nurses during World War one. And that's the Gilded age is really. Gilded is a good phrase, because it was gilded. It was gold plated sorrow. And Hemingway said, to call us the lost generation isn't fair. Every generation is lost. Every generation was broken by something, and. But this generation was really broken by technology. And I have an open letter to young Americans, an introduction to young Americans called the Adventure of Eros. Love, piety, and posterity. And for every letter, I've received a lot of messages. Someone's already used it in a paper, term paper, which is, you know, it's just a few weeks out, and somebody wrote me an email. I used your. I used your book in a term paper. But the struggle to have authentic Eros awakening has been destroyed by pornography and smartphones and dating apps. So this generation, they're very wise, though, and they call everyone over 25, I guess, a boomer. [00:49:29] Speaker A: Right. [00:49:30] Speaker B: And I think that's very wise, because I think if you were went through puberty before you had a smartphone in your pocket, you're completely different than someone who had a smartphone in their pocket as they were going through puberty. Yeah. [00:49:46] Speaker A: It's a fundamental shift. [00:49:47] Speaker B: Yes. And so these young people are waking up. What? So there's hope. There's. A lot of them are coming, even to the faith, but they're bitter and angry. And so we have a duty to form this generation. Understand? They're angry. It's of no fault of their own. They didn't choose to be looking at pornography when they were nine years old, and they had it. You know, I say, if Michael J. Fox showed up to me when I was in junior high with a smartphone and his DeLorean, knowing what I know now, I'd shoot him with a shotgun right in his chest. Right, exactly. Sears catalog was dangerous enough. Don't, you know, don't give me this, but. So to your point of, I have hope with these young people, but they scare me, too. And I think that a nietzschean godless right may be a greater challenge to the future. And sort of this woke, vicious utopian laugh. So this is the fundamental importance of catholic apostolates, like crisis and like, the vulnerable people project that we really need to speak in to the sorrow and pain of these young people. And I'm grateful that you gave me an opportunity to write this book, because the truth is, I wrote this book for that generation. And I'm so excited to say the turning point USA is going to be doing a summer essay competition with $50,000 in scholarships and prizes around the book. [00:51:14] Speaker A: That's awesome. [00:51:15] Speaker B: And something I'm really grateful for. Yeah. Yeah. [00:51:18] Speaker A: Well, thanks for talking with us, Jason. This is great. I know you got a million other things you're doing right now and want to spend time with your son, I'm sure, while you're out. I always love when I have to take a trip for some reason, some bit, and I'm able to take one of my kids with me. It just. It's no longer a business trip then. It's just like now. It's like, okay, now I spend time with one of my kids, and I think that's, that's fun to do, but, okay, so the great campaign against great reset, of course, I'll put a link to it for, for people to purchase it. I really do encourage you to do so. Also, where can people find out about all the stuff you're doing? Like, what's the best place to go to say, okay, what's Jason Jones up to these days? [00:51:53] Speaker B: Well, the Jason Jones show is the best place to go. And striking how big this little show has become. Just yesterday, my son and I were in an ice cream shop, and a young woman was looking at me. I thought I had something on my nose, or. And she's like, excuse me, sir. Are you Jason Jones? I'm a surface worker officer in the Navy, and I always listen to your show. That meant a lot to me. So the Jason Jones show. And I have no filter, by the way, people call me and go, do you know what you just said on your show? You're not in a confessional, you know. I said, oh, okay, I don't know, but. And then vulnerable peopleproject.com or follow us on Instagram. Vulnerable. The vulnerable people project. And I think you'll be surprised to see the work that we do and where we do it and it into your, one of your first questions. It's all by the grace of God. We say the work we do. It's the holy spirit action plan. God does things right next to us. Then we point to our donors. Look what we did. We just did that. But the truth is, the real reality is God does things right next to us, and we just point and take credit. [00:52:52] Speaker A: Amen. Amen. Well, thanks, Jason. I appreciate it. Encourage people again. Buy the book. Check out all that Jason's workdays doing. And if you can, if you're able to support, obviously, pray for it. But also, if you can financially support it, I encourage people to do so. Okay. Until next time, everybody. God love.

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